Ekibhava, Ekībhāva: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Ekibhava means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव).—Fusion, mixture, union, combination (of 2 or more letters); cf. उदात्तवति एकीभावे उदात्तं सन्ध्यमक्षरम् (udāttavati ekībhāve udāttaṃ sandhyamakṣaram), R. Pr.III.6.एकीभाव (ekībhāva) is said to be resulting from the coalescence called अभिनिहितसन्धि (abhinihitasandhi), cf. R. Pr. II.16, 17.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Vyakarana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव) or Ekībhāvatva refers to a “state of oneness”, according to the Devīpañcaśataka, an important source of the Kālīkrama that developed in Kashmir after the Kālī Mata of the Jayadrathayāmala.—Accordingly, “[...] It is Śiva’s will in the form of the Transmental and With Mind, (arisen as) both non-dual and dual (respectively). [...] Linked to Moon, Sun and Fire, she generates the seeds of (her) energies. Her form is one and, transcendent (nirālokā), is the supreme abode. She assumes a state of oneness [i.e., ekībhāva-tva] in the middle of one who possesses (her) radiant energy. She shines, present in multiplicity (nānākhya) like the light of many suns. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव) refers to “one” (i.e., ‘oneness of phenomena’), according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[...] He should treat [all phenomena] as one (ekībhāva), not as separate. He should not drink [alcohol] or eat meat idly [with no ritual purpose]. He should not drink wine without first purifying it [with mantras], and he should consume meat after he has purified it with that [wine]. He should not answer the call of nature, should not sip water, etc., while reciting mantras or in an assembly. If he does so out of folly, the curse of the Yoginīs will fall on him. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Ekibhava in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ekībhāva : (m.) unity; solitude; loneliness.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva, (eka + bhāva, with ī for a in compn. with bhū) being alone, loneliness, solitude D III 245; M.II, 250; A.III, 289; V, 89, 164; Vism.34; SnA 92, 93; DhA.II, 103; VvA.202; DA.I, 253, 309. (Page 160)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव).—

1) Combination, association.

2) Common nature or property.

Derivable forms: ekībhāvaḥ (एकीभावः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव).—m.

(-vaḥ) Common nature or property. E. eka with cvi augment, and bhāva nature.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव).—i. e. eka-bhū + a, m. Union. [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 217, 10.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव).—[masculine] becoming one.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव):—[=ekī-bhāva] [from ekī > eka] m. the becoming one, coalition, [Vedāntasāra; Ṛgveda-prātiśākhya etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekībhāva (एकीभाव):—[ekī-bhāva] (vaḥ) 1. m. Common nature.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ekibhava in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ēkībhāva (ಏಕೀಭಾವ):—[noun] the fact or an instance of integrating; the resultant feeling or attitude.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of ekibhava in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Related products

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: