Ekacara, aka: Eka-cara; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ekacara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Ekachara.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Ekacara (एकचर) is a Sanskrit word referring to “animals which, as a rule, roam about alone” (e.g., serpents). The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.17)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Ekacara in Pali glossary... « previous · [E] · next »

ekacara : (adj.) one who lives alone.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Ekacara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [E] · next »

ēkacara (एकचर).—a (S) Segregarious: as disting. from anēkacara Gregarious.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ēkacara (एकचर).—a Segregarious.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekacara (एकचर).—a.

1) wandering or living alone, alone; अयमेकचरोऽ भिवर्तते माम् (ayamekacaro' bhivartate mām) Ki.13.3;3.53. Kau. A.1.18. स्वच्छन्दमेकचरं (svacchandamekacaraṃ) Mudrā.

2) having one attendant.

3) living unassisted.

4) going together or at the same time.

5) gregarious.

6) (Said of certain animals); न भक्षयेदेकचरान् (na bhakṣayedekacarān) Ms.5.17; Bhāg.5.8.18. (-raḥ) 1 a rhinoceros.

2) An ascetic (yati); नाराजके जनपदे चरत्येकचरो वशी (nārājake janapade caratyekacaro vaśī) Rām.2.67.23.

Ekacara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms eka and cara (चर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekacara (एकचर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-rī-raṃ) 1. Solitary, alone. 2. Having one follower. m.

(-raḥ) A rhinoceros. E. eka alone, and cara who goes.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1157 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Eka
Eka (एक).—mfn. (-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) 1. One. 2. Alone, solitary. 3. Other, different. 4. Chief, pre-emi...
Cara
Cara (चर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā or -rī-raṃ) 1. Moveable, locomotive. 2. Trembling, shaking, unsteady. ...
Ekapada
Ekapāda (एकपाद).—In iconography, ekapāda does not come under the heading sthānaka, but is found...
Gocara
Gocara (गोचर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. An object of sense, as sound, shape, colour, &c. 2. A. country,...
Shanaishcara
Śanaiścara (शनैश्चर) refers to “saturn” and represents one of the items held in the left hand o...
Ekanta
Ekānta (एकान्त) refers to “absolutistic attitude” and represents one of the five types of ...
Ekakshara
Ekākṣara (एकाक्षर).—n. (-raṃ) A monosyllable, especially the sacred monosyllable Om. E. eka and...
Ekavali
Ekāvalī (एकावली).—f. (-lī) A single string of beads, flowers, &c. E. eka and āvalī a row.
Ekacakra
Ekacakra (एकचक्र).—m. (-kraḥ) The name of a city: see harigṛha. E. eka, cakra a circle.
Ekaksha
Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣā-kṣaṃ) One-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) A crow. E. eka and akṣi an eye.
Ekata
Ekatā (एकता).—f. (-tā) Unity, oneness. E. eka and tal affix. or with tva aff. ekatva n. (-tvaṃ)
Ekajata
Ekajaṭā (एकजटा) refers to a deity from the Blue Tārā family, according to Buddhist Iconography....
Pratyeka
Pratyeka (प्रत्येक).—n. Adv. (-kaṃ) Singly, one by one, one at a time. E. prati, and eka one.
Ekavira
Ekavīra (एकवीर) is the name of a tree mentioned in connection with a Tantric ceremony, accordin...
Ekeka
Ekaika (एकैक).—mfn. (-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Single, one by one E. eka repeated.

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