Dvipada, aka: Dvi-pada, Dvipāda; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Dvipada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Dvipada in Purana glossaries]

Dvipāda (द्विपाद).—A name of Vighneśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 68.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Dvipada in Jainism glossaries]

1) Dvipada (द्विपद) refers to “two-footed”, and represents classification of things that can be stolen (steya, caurya), according to Umāsvāti’s Śrāvaka-prajñapti 265 and Haribhadra’s commentary on the Āvaśyaka-sūtra p. 822b. It is related to the Asteya-vrata (vow of not stealing).

2) Dvipada (द्विपद) refers to “servants and birds” and represents one of the classes of the external (bahya) division of attachment (parigraha) and is related to the Aparigraha-vrata (vow of non-attachment). Dvipada is listed in Śvetāmbara sources such as Devagupta’s Nava-pada-prakaraṇa with Laghu-vṛtti (58).

Dvipada is generally taken to include all the members of the household (wives, slaves, servants) and also domesticated birds such as parrots or peacocks. The oldest texts, for example, the Āvaśyaka-cūrṇī mention alongside dvipada and catuṣpada a category of apada objects including carts and trees. Carts figure at amuch later date in the dvipada class of the Śrāddha-dina-kṛtya, inappropriately in the context as they cannot be said to propagate themselves.

(Source): archive.org: Jaina Yoga
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Dvipada in Marathi glossaries]

dvipada (द्विपद).—a (S) Biped. 2 In arithmetic. Binomial.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dvipada (द्विपद).—a Biped; binomial.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Dvipada in Sanskrit glossaries]

Dvipada (द्विपद).—a. having two feet (as a verse).

Dvipada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dvi and pada (पद).

--- OR ---

Dvipada (द्विपद).—a biped man.

Derivable forms: dvipadaḥ (द्विपदः).

Dvipada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dvi and pada (पद).

--- OR ---

Dvipāda (द्विपाद).—

1) a biped, man.

2) a bird.

3) a god.

Derivable forms: dvipādaḥ (द्विपादः).

Dvipāda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dvi and pāda (पाद).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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