Dvaparayuga, aka: Dvāparayuga, Dvapara-yuga; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Dvaparayuga means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

Dvapara Yuga (द्वापर युग) is the third out of four yugas, or ages, described in the scriptures of Hinduism. This yuga comes after Treta Yuga and before Kali Yuga. According to the Puranas this yuga ended at the moment when Krishna returned to his eternal abode of Vaikuntha. According to the Bhagavata Purana, the Dvapara Yuga lasts 864,000 years.

There are only two pillars left of religion in the Dvapara Yuga: Compassion and Truthfulness. Lord Vishnu assumes the colour yellow and the Vedas are categorized into four parts that is Rig, Sama, Yajur and Atharva. During these times the Brahmins are knowledgeable of two, sometimes three Vedas, but rarely have studied all the four Vedas thoroughly. Accordingly, because of this categorization, different actions and activities come into existence.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Dvāparayuga (द्वापरयुग) or simply Dvāpara refers to the “twofold age” and represents the third of the “four ages” (yuga) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 88). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., dvāpara-yuga). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

India history and geogprahy

The dvaparayuga refers to the third of the four yugas.—The anniversary of the first day ot the Dvapara-yuga falls on the thirteenth of the waning moon in the mouth of Bhadra (August-September) of which Shri Krishna and Buddhi were the incarnations.

(Source): archive.org: South Indian Festivities
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Relevant definitions

Search found 320 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kaliyuga
Kaliyuga (कलियुग) or simply Kali refers to the “dark age” and represents the last of the “four ...
Yuga
Yuga (युग) or Caturyuga refers to the “four ages” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 88...
Tretayuga
Tretāyuga (त्रेतायुग) or simply Tretā refers to the “threefold-life age” and represents the sec...
Satyayuga
satyayuga (सत्ययुग).—n The first of the four ages, the golden age.
Dvapara
Dvāpara (द्वापर) or Dvāparayuga refers to the “twofold age” and represents the third of the “fo...
Kritayuga
Kṛtayuga (कृतयुग) or simply Kṛta refers to the “accomplished age ” and represents the first of ...
Caturyuga
Caturyuga (चतुर्युग) or simply Yuga refers to the “four ages” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha...
Triyuga
Triyuga (त्रियुग).—A name of Viṣṇu meaning one who appears in only three yugas.
Yugapurana
Yugapurāṇa (युगपुराण) refers to the “purāṇa of the yugas” and is the name of the forty-first ch...
Yuga Dharma
Yuga Dharma (युगधर्म): One aspect of Dharma, as understood by Hindus. Yuga dharma is an aspect ...
Kalpa
Kalpa (कल्प) or Caturkalpa refers to the “four aeons” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (sectio...
Tapasya
Tapasya (तपस्य) refrers to one of the ten sons of Tāmasa Manu (of the fourth manvantara), accor...
Krishna
Kṛṣṇa (कृष्ण) refers to the last of the “ten world protectors” (daśalokapāla) as defined in the...
Vyasa
Vyāsa (व्यास) is an example of a name based on an Epic or Purana mentioned in the Gupta inscrip...
Kali
Kali (कलि) or Kaliyuga refers to the “dark age” and represents the last of the “four ages” (yug...

Relevant text

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