Durdhara, aka: Dur-dhara; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Durdhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Durdhara (दुर्धर) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 57. The temple is mentioned as one of the twenty temples being a favorite of Viṣṇu. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Durdhara in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Durdhara (दुर्धर): A son of Dhritarashtra killed by Bhima in the war.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Durdhara in Jainism glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Durdhara (दुर्धर) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Durdhara] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Durdhara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

durdhara (दुर्धर).—a S Difficult of seizure, apprehension, or attainment. 2 (Poetry.) Difficult, dangerous, dreadful, impracticable, rigorous, austere, harsh, hard &c. freely. Ex. tapa karīta du0 || aṅgīṃ cālalā dharmapūra ||; also mahādurdhara kānana ||.

--- OR ---

durdhara (दुर्धर).—m S A division of the infernal regions.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

durdhara (दुर्धर).—a Difficult of seizure, apprehen- sion, or attainment. Difficult.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durdhara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Durdhara (दुर्धर).—a.

1) irresistible, difficult to be stopped.

2) difficult to be borne or suffered; दुर्धरेण मदनेन साद्यते (durdhareṇa madanena sādyate) Ghat.11; Ms.7.28.

3) difficult to be accomplished.

4) difficult to be kept in memory.

-raḥ quicksilver.

Durdhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and dhara (धर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durdhara (दुर्धर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Difficult to be sustained or borne, troublesome, unbearable. 2. Irresistible, difficult to be restrained. m.

(-raḥ) 1. A division of hell. 2. A kind of drug, commonly Rishabha. 3. The name of an Asura or Titan. E. dur bad, ill, dhara having, possessing; it is also written durddhara . duḥkhena dhāryate dur + dhṛ-karmaṇi khal .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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