Durbala, Dur-bala, Durbāla: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Durbala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Durbal.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Durbala in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Trichodesma zeylanicum (Burm.f.) R.Br. from the Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not) family having the following synonyms: Borago zeylanica, Pollichia zeylanica, Borraginoides zeylanica. For the possible medicinal usage of durbala, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Durbala (दुर्बल) refers to the “weak”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Then the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja said this to the congregation of Bodhisattvas: ‘Sons of good family, may all of you elucidate the gates into the dharma of transcending the path of the works of Māra’ [...] The Bodhisattva Gandhahastin said: ‘The weak (durbala) can be harmed by the Māra; but the strong cannot be harmed by the māra. The weak is afraid of the three gates of liberation. Since the strong is not afraid of the three gates of liberation, namely, directly seeing, penetrating, and meditatively cultivating. One who is not afraid of them transcends the sphere of the Māra, and thus this is the gate into the light of the dharma called “Transcending the sphere of the Māra”’”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

durbala (दुर्बल) [or ळ, ḷa].—a in poetry durbaḷī a (durbala S) Weak, powerless, impotent. 2 Poor, indigent.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

durbala (दुर्बल) [or ḷa, or ळ].—a Weak, powerless. Poor.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durbala (दुर्बल).—a.

1) weak, feeble.

2) enfeebled, spiritless; दुर्बलान्यङ्गकानि (durbalānyaṅgakāni) Uttararāmacarita 1.24.

3) thin, lean, emaciated; Uttararāmacarita 3.

4) small, scanty, little; स्वार्थोप- पत्तिं प्रति दुर्बलाशः (svārthopa- pattiṃ prati durbalāśaḥ) R.5.12.

Durbala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and bala (बल).

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Durbāla (दुर्बाल).—a.

1) bald-headed.

2) void of prepuce.

3) having crooked hair.

Durbāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and bāla (बाल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durbala (दुर्बल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Feeble, thin, emaciated. 2. Weak, impotent. m. (-l) One who is circomcised, or whose glans penis is void of prepuce. E. dur implying depreciation or diminution, and bala strong, potent. duḥsthitaṃ balamasya .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durbala (दुर्बल).—adj., f. . 1. weak, feeble, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 128. 2. without a prepuce, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 151(?).

Durbala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dus and bala (बल).

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Durbāla (दुर्बाल).—[Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 151 v. r. The signification is questionable; Medātithi gives, bald-pated, or red-haired, or without a prepuce.

Durbāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dus and bāla (बाल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durbala (दुर्बल).—[adjective] weak, feeble, thin, unwell; poor, scanty. Abstr. [feminine]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Durbala (दुर्बल):—[=dur-bala] [from dur] mfn. of little strength, weak, feeble, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] thin, slender (waist), [Rāmāyaṇa iii, 52, 31]

3) [v.s. ...] emaciated, lean (cow)

4) [v.s. ...] sick, unwell, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra xxv, 7, 1; Mahābhārata iv, 182]

5) [v.s. ...] scanty, small, little, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] m. an impotent man, weakling, [Manu-smṛti iii, 151] ([varia lectio] -vāla)

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of bird ([wrong reading] for -bali)

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a prince, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

9) [v.s. ...] of an author, [Catalogue(s)]

10) Durbalā (दुर्बला):—[=dur-balā] [from dur-bala > dur] f. a species of plant (= ambu-śirīṣikā), [Bhāvaprakāśa]

11) Durbāla (दुर्बाल):—[=dur-bāla] [from dur] See -vāla.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Durbala (दुर्बल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dubbasa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Durbala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Durbala in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Durbala (दुर्बल) [Also spelled durbal]:—(a) weak, feeble; powerless; emaciated; imbecile; ~[latā] weakness, feebleness; emaciation, debility; imbecility; ~[lamanaska] feeble-minded; ~[lecchā] velleity, weak will.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Durbala (ದುರ್ಬಲ):—[adjective] not strong; lacking physical strength; weak.

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Durbala (ದುರ್ಬಲ):—

1) [noun] a man with a feeble physical personality; a weak man.

2) [noun] anything that is weak.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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