Drughana, Drūghaṇa, Drughaṇa, Dru-ghana: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Drughana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Drughana in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdomlib Libary: The Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa

Drughaṇa (द्रुघण) refers to “mallets” (wooden maces) and represents one of the various weapons equipped by the Daityas in their war against Lalitā, according to the Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa 4.22. Accordingly, “[...] thereupon, crores of Daityas producing reverberating chattering noise furiously prepared themselves (to fight) against Parameśvarī (Lalitā). [...] Crores of Daityas were fully equipped with coats of mail and had the following weapons and missiles in their hands [viz.: Drughaṇas (mallets, wooden maces)], and thousands of similar weapons and missiles very dreadful and capable of destroying living beings”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Drughaṇa (द्रुघण, “hammer”) is found in the Mudgala hymn of the Rigveda and in the Atharvaveda. The sense is uncertain. Yāska renders it as a ‘ghana made of wood,’ probably, as Roth takes it, meaning a ‘club of wood’. Geldner thinks that it was a wooden bull used by Mudgala as a substitute for a second bull when he wanted to join in a race. But this interpretation of the legend is very improbable. Whitney translates the word as ‘tree-smiter’ in the Atharvaveda, quoting Sāyaṇa, who explains it as a ‘cutting instrument’, so called because trees are struck with it.

Ṣaḍguruśiṣya explains that Mudgala’s oxen were stolen, that he pursued the thieves with the one old ox he had left, and that hurling his hammer (drughaṇa) he caught the marauders. Yāska, on the other hand, says that Mudgala won a race with a drughaṇa and an ox instead of with two oxen.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Drūghaṇa (द्रूघण).—A hammer, an iron club; see दुघण (dughaṇa).

Derivable forms: drūghaṇaḥ (द्रूघणः).

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Drughaṇa (द्रुघण).—

1) a mallet, wooden mace.

2) an iron weapon made like a carpenter's hammer.

3) an axe, a hatchet.

4) an epithet of Brahmā

Derivable forms: drughaṇaḥ (द्रुघणः).

Drughaṇa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dru and ghaṇa (घण).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Drughaṇa (द्रुघण).—m.

(-ṇaḥ) 1. A mace, a mallet, an iron weapon made like a carpenter’s hammer. 2. An axe, a hatchet. 3. A name of Bramha. 4. A plant: see bhūmicampaka. E. dru a tree, han to injure or demolish, affix ap, and ghana substituted for the radical; na is usually changed to ṇa, but the word is also written drughana . druḥ vṛkṣaḥ saṃsāragatirvā hanyate anena .

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Drūghaṇa (द्रूघण).—m.

(-ṇaḥ) 1. A name of Bramha. 2. An iron club. 3. A sort of hatchet. E. dru a tree, han to strike, affix ap, gha and ṇa substituted for ha and na, and the vowel of dru made long; also optionally drughaṇa, drughana, and drūghana .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Drughaṇa (द्रुघण).—[masculine] a wooden mace.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Drughaṇa (द्रुघण):—[=dru-ghaṇa] [from dru] m. a wooden mace, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] axe, hatchet (also na), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Kaempferia Rotunda, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of Brahmā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Drūghaṇa (द्रूघण):—[=drū-ghaṇa] m. = dru-ghana, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Drughaṇa (द्रुघण):—(ṇaḥ) 1. m. A mace, a mallet, an axe; Brahmā; a plant.

2) Drūghaṇa (द्रूघण):—(ṇaḥ) 1. m. Brahmā; iron club.

[Sanskrit to German]

Drughana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Drughaṇa (ದ್ರುಘಣ):—

1) [noun] a wooden hammer.

2) [noun] a tool having a long wooden handle and a heavy metal head with a blade on one side used for chopping trees and splitting wood; an axe; a hatchet.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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