Dramila, Drāmila: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Dramila means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Dramila (द्रमिल) is the name of a tribe, usually to be represented by a brown (asita) color when painting the limbs (aṅgaracanā), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. The word can also be spelled as Dramila in Pali, and it they are also known by the name Draviḍa. The painting is a component of nepathya (costumes and make-up) and is to be done in accordance with the science of āhāryābhinaya (extraneous representation).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of dramila in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Dramila in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Dramila (द्रमिल) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Same as Draviḍa.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

Discover the meaning of dramila in the context of Kavya from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Dramila (द्रमिल) is the name of an ancient kingdom, according to chapter 4.2 [vāsupūjya-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as Vasupūjya and Jayā spoke to Vāsupūjya:—“All the existing kings, among men and the Vidyādharas, who are of good family, capable, heroic, wealthy, famous, possessing the fourfold army, known for guarding their subjects, free from blemish, faithful to engagements, always devoted to dharma, in Madhyadeśa, Vatsadeśa, [...] and other countries which are the ornaments of the eastern quarter; [... in the Dramilas, ...] these now, son, beg us constantly through messengers, who are sent bearing valuable gifts, to give their daughters to you. [...]”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of dramila in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dramila (द्रमिल).—See द्रविडः (draviḍaḥ).

Derivable forms: dramilaḥ (द्रमिलः).

See also (synonyms): dramiḍa.

--- OR ---

Drāmila (द्रामिल).—Name of Chāṇakya.

Derivable forms: drāmilaḥ (द्रामिलः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Drāmila (द्रामिल).—m.

(-laḥ) The Muni Chanakya. E. dramila a proper name, and aṇ patronymic aff. dramilo deśo'bhojano’sya .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dramila (द्रमिल).—[masculine] [Name] of a people.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dramila (द्रमिल):—m. Name of a country (also = draviḍa), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) of a lexicographer ([varia lectio] drim)

3) [plural] his school, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.; Catalogue(s)]

4) Drāmila (द्रामिल):—m. ‘born in Dramila’, Name of Cāṇakya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] ([varia lectio] dromiṇa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Drāmila (द्रामिल):—(laḥ) 1. m. The sage Chanakya.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Dramila (द्रमिल):—m.

1) Nomen proprium einer Gegend: deśe bhavo drāmilaḥ (cāṇakya) [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 854,] [Scholiast] —

2) pl. Name einer Schule [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 512,] [Scholiast] drimila sg. Nomen proprium eines Lexicographen [364, Scholiast]; vgl. [Oxforder Handschriften 185], b, wo dramila sg. als Nomen proprium nach derselben Quelle aufgeführt wird.

--- OR ---

Drāmila (द्रामिल):—(von dramila) m. Beiname Cāṇakya’s [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 854.] dromiṇa [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 2, 7, 22.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Dramila (द्रमिल):—m. Nomen proprium —

1) Pl. eines Volkes [Hemacandra's Pariśiṣṭaparvan 11,99.] = draviḍa [Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society 1871,236.] —

2) eines Lexicographen. Pl. seine Schule.

--- OR ---

Drāmila (द्रामिल):—m. Beiname Cāṇakya's.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of dramila in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: