Divyaratna, aka: Divya-ratna; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Divyaratna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Divyaratna in Mahayana glossaries]

Divyaratna (दिव्यरत्न, “divine jewels”) refers to one of the three classes of jewels (ratna), into which the universe was transformed by the Buddha’s miraculous power (ṛddhibala) according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XV). Accordingly, “Divine jewels (divya-ratna) are larger and more powerful; they always accompany the gods; one can give orders to them and communicate with them; they are light and not heavy”.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Divyaratna in Sanskrit glossaries]

Divyaratna (दिव्यरत्न).—a fabulous gem said to grant all desires of its possessor, the philosopher's stone; cf. चिन्तामणि (cintāmaṇi).

Derivable forms: divyaratnam (दिव्यरत्नम्).

Divyaratna is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms divya and ratna (रत्न).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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