Dipyamana, Dīpyamāna, Dīpyamānā: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Dipyamana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Dipyamana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान) refers to “(one whose form is) luminous”, and represents an epithet of Śiva used in Sandhyā’s eulogy of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.6. Accordingly:—“[...] Directly perceiving the lord of Durgā she [viz., Sandhyā] eulogised the lord of the worlds: [...] Obeisance to Thee whose form is solitary, pure, luminous (dīpyamāna), free from illusion, knowledge-cum-bliss, naturally undecaying, eternal bliss, delighted at the outcome of truth and prosperity and productive of glory”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Dipyamana in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Dīpyamānā (दीप्यमाना) refers to “(she who was) being illuminated”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 225).—Accordingly, while describing the shire of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, “[Then the portal to the sanctum sanctorum, a riot of colour and form:] She was being illuminated (dīpyamānā) by the entrance, on which there were hanging cloths reddened by lamp-smoke, a row of bracelets made of peacock-throats festooned [over it], a garland of bells closely-set and pale with powdered flour-cakes, which supported two door-panels, [studded] with tin lion heads with thick, iron pins in their centers, barricaded with an ivory-rod bolt, carrying [what seemed to be] a necklace of sparkling bubbles that were mirrors oozing yellow, blue and red [light]”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Dipyamana in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान) refers to “one who burns intensely” and is used to describe Navātman, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, [while describing the visualized form of Navātman Bhairava]: “[...] Navātman’s mind is blissful with his own energy and he is delighted by the bliss of (spiritual) wine. [...] (He is) adorned with a garland of skulls and is beautiful in all (his) limbs. Replete with all (the good) characteristics, he is in the midst of the host of Yoginīs. He has a large chest and a big belly and is very strong. A corpse is placed (under) the soles of (his) feet and, burning intensely (dīpyamāna), he is very powerful. [...]”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान) refers to “blazing”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I seek refuge with the glorious goddess Sundarī, the benefactress of prosperity, the secret heart, whose heart is soaked with compassion. She is blazing (dīpyamāna) with an utmost tenacity steeped in joy, and consequently beaming with plenteous light that shimmers spontaneously. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Dipyamana in Yoga glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान) refers to the “shining (of the sun)”, according to the Amṛtasiddhi, a 12th-century text belonging to the Haṭhayoga textual tradition.—Accordingly, “The sphere of the sun is at the base of the Central Channel, complete with twelve digits, shining (dīpyamāna) with its rays. The lord of creatures (Prajāpati), of intense appearance, travels upwards on the right. Staying in the pathways in the spaces in the channels it pervades the entire body. The sun consumes the lunar secretion, wanders in the sphere of the wind and burns up all the bodily constituents in all bodies”.

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान) refers to “illustrious (kings)”, according to the the Amanaska Yoga treatise dealing with meditation, absorption, yogic powers and liberation.—Accordingly, as Īśvara says to Vāmadeva: “The [internal yoga] is called Rājayoga. O chief of sages, it alone is known as Rājayoga because it is the king of all yogas. However, [the internal yoga] is [properly] called Rājayoga, because it enables a person to reach the illustrious (dīpyamāna) king who is the imperishable, supreme self. [...]”

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dipyamana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) Shining, radiant, irradiating. E. dīp to shine, śānac aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpyamāna (दीप्यमान):—[dīpya-māna] (naḥ-nā-naṃ) p. Illuminated.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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