Dipta, Dīptā: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Dipta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Dipt.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Dīptā (दीप्ता) is another name for Jyotiṣmatī, a medicinal plant identified with Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Dīptā and Jyotiṣmatī, there are a total of twelve Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Dīptā (दीप्ता) is also mentioned as a synonym for Sātalā, an unidentified medicinal plant (seven possible species identifed), according to verse 4.194-195. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Dīptā and Sātalā, there are a total of thirteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Dīpta (दीप्त) is the name of a Mahoraga mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Dīpta).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त).—mfn.

(-ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) 1 Luminous, splendid, radiant. 2. Blazing, glowing. 3. Burnt. n.

(-ptaṃ) 1. Gold. 2. Asafœtida. m.

(-ptaḥ) 1. A lion. 2. A lime. f.

(-ptā) A plant: see lāṅgalikī. E. dīp to blaze, to shine, affix kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त).—[adjective] blazing, flaming, glowing, hot, bright, radiant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Dīpta (दीप्त) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—(?). Oppert. Ii, 3413.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dīpta (दीप्त):—[from dīp] mfn. blazing, flaming, hot, shining, bright, brilliant, splendid, [Muṇḍaka-upaniṣad ii, 1, 1; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] excited, agitated (krodha-, [Mahābhārata v, 7207])

3) [v.s. ...] (in augury) exposed to the sun (also āditya-, [Mahābhārata iii, 15669])

4) [v.s. ...] being on the wrong side, inauspicious (opp. to śānta), [Harivaṃśa; Suśruta; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

5) [v.s. ...] clear, shrill (? applied to the inauspicious voice of an animal and opp. to pūrṇa), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā lxxxviii, 11]

6) [v.s. ...] [xci, 1; Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] m. a lion (from his bright colour), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] the citron tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] inflammation of the nose, [Suśruta]

10) [v.s. ...] (ā), Methonica Superba, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Cardiospermum Halicacabum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] = sātalā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] red arsenic, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] (in music) a [particular] tone

15) [v.s. ...] a [particular] Śakti, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi i, 5]

16) [v.s. ...] n. Asa Foetida, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] gold, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त):—[(ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) a.] Luminous; burnt. m. A lion; a lime. f. A plant. n. Gold; asafoetida.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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