Dipta, Dīptā: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Dipta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Dipt.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Dīptā (दीप्ता) is another name for Jyotiṣmatī, a medicinal plant identified with Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Dīptā and Jyotiṣmatī, there are a total of twelve Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Dīptā (दीप्ता) is also mentioned as a synonym for Sātalā, an unidentified medicinal plant (seven possible species identifed), according to verse 4.194-195. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Dīptā and Sātalā, there are a total of thirteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Dīpta (दीप्त) (lit. “one who is bright in colour”) is a synonym (another name) for the Lion (Siṃha), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Dīpta (दीप्त) refers to “burning”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. [...] The trees will fail to yield in their appropriate seasons; birds and animals will appear to be burning [i.e., dīpta]; there will be an appearance of false fire all round; and lightning and earthquake will afflict mankind”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Dīptā (दीप्ता) refers to “(she who is being) enflamed (by the burning point)”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] Her form is the Triangle and her plane unlimited ability. She is enflamed by the burning Point (prajvaladbindu-dīptā). Causing (nectar) to flow, she floods the entire plane of the universe with dense currents of nectar. Active in the utterance (of mantra that takes place) in the centre, she pervades all things with the mass of (her) red and beautiful rays. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Dīpta (दीप्त) refers to the “burning (of karmas together with their consequences)”, according to the Jñānaratnāvalī, (p. 267).—Accordingly, “Next, the bhautikī-dīkṣā is twofold, and it is said [in the scriptures]: ‘In the same way the bhautikī-dīkṣā [is achieved] through ritual and union [and] is also of a superior and inferior kind. Rather, for the [still] deluded [souls] he should preserve the prārabdha karma, which has the purpose of keeping [the initiate] with his [current] body, after joining it with [the karma] to be cultivated for the practice of propitiating Śaiva mantras for supernatural powers. The other [karmas] together with their consequences he should burn (dīpta) in the blazing initiation fire’. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Dīptā (दीप्ता) refers to “lighting up” (the sky), according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “An abnormal modification caused by a aggressive ritual against Kings, occurring at the improper time, dreadful and all-reaching, is characterized by the these signs: [...] frightful jackals enter unimpeded the innermost of the temple and howl loudly at the [morning and evening] twilights, when the sky is lit up (dīptādīptāyāṃ diśi visvaram); enemies proud of their strength besiege the King’s [capital] city; [...] from such and other signs he should understand that the enemy is performing a aggressive ritual”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Dīpta (दीप्त) is the name of a Mahoraga mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Dīpta).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Dīpta (दीप्त) refers to “flaming (efforts)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “[...] If he is in the state of concentration, but ends up inan unpleasant situation, he is not irritated. Even thought he always manifests peacefulness to noble beings, he makes flaming efforts (dīpta-vīrya) in order to bring ordinary people to maturity. Being in the state of sameness in concentration, he still teaches those with irregular behaviour by means of various kinds of teachings. He does not see the irregular in terms of sameness, and he does not obstruct the irregular with sameness. Since he is unobstructed, he is called the meditator whose thought is just like open space, without any obstruction, he is called a meditator with great insight, and he is called the meditator who is not dependent on consciousness. When meditation is understood in this way, then the meditation of the Bodhisattva is like the expanse of open space, which is not dependent on anything”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त).—mfn.

(-ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) 1 Luminous, splendid, radiant. 2. Blazing, glowing. 3. Burnt. n.

(-ptaṃ) 1. Gold. 2. Asafœtida. m.

(-ptaḥ) 1. A lion. 2. A lime. f.

(-ptā) A plant: see lāṅgalikī. E. dīp to blaze, to shine, affix kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त).—[adjective] blazing, flaming, glowing, hot, bright, radiant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Dīpta (दीप्त) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—(?). Oppert. Ii, 3413.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dīpta (दीप्त):—[from dīp] mfn. blazing, flaming, hot, shining, bright, brilliant, splendid, [Muṇḍaka-upaniṣad ii, 1, 1; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] excited, agitated (krodha-, [Mahābhārata v, 7207])

3) [v.s. ...] (in augury) exposed to the sun (also āditya-, [Mahābhārata iii, 15669])

4) [v.s. ...] being on the wrong side, inauspicious (opp. to śānta), [Harivaṃśa; Suśruta; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

5) [v.s. ...] clear, shrill (? applied to the inauspicious voice of an animal and opp. to pūrṇa), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā lxxxviii, 11]

6) [v.s. ...] [xci, 1; Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] m. a lion (from his bright colour), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] the citron tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] inflammation of the nose, [Suśruta]

10) [v.s. ...] (ā), Methonica Superba, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Cardiospermum Halicacabum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] = sātalā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] red arsenic, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] (in music) a [particular] tone

15) [v.s. ...] a [particular] Śakti, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi i, 5]

16) [v.s. ...] n. Asa Foetida, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] gold, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त):—[(ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) a.] Luminous; burnt. m. A lion; a lime. f. A plant. n. Gold; asafoetida.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dīpta (दीप्त) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ditta, Dippa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dipta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Dīpta (दीप्त) [Also spelled dipt]:—(a) radiant; luminous, brilliant, bright.

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Dīpta (ದೀಪ್ತ):—

1) [adjective] shining brightly; brilliant; radiant.

2) [adjective] burning; flaming.

--- OR ---

Dīpta (ದೀಪ್ತ):—

1) [noun] a lustrous, brilliant thing.

2) [noun] the day time.

3) [noun] one of the twenty eight Śaiva religious scriptures.

4) [noun] the direction in which sunrise occurs; the east.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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