Dinnaga, aka: Dinnāga, Diṅnāga, Dish-naga; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Dinnaga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Dinnaga in Purana glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Dinnāga (दिन्नाग).—The famous Buddhist dialectician Dinnāga came to Kāñcī to satisfy his intellectual and spiritual thirst and about the middle of the fourth century A.D.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions (purana)

Diṅnāga (दिङ्नाग).—A Sanskrit dramatist who lived between the second and fifth centuries A.D. "Dhīranāga" was his other name. The Sanskrit drama "KUNDAMĀLĀ" which is based on Uttara Rāmāyaṇa and has six acts, was composed by Diṅnāga. Diṅnāga, the Buddhist preacher and this Diṅnāga are two different persons. Vināyakā and Śiva are praised in the introductory stanzas of Kundamālā (A.B. Keith: Classical Sanskrit literature).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Diṅnāga (दिङ्नाग).—

1) an elephant of the quarter of the compass; see दिग्गज (diggaja).

2) Name of a poet said to be a contemporary of Kālidāsa. (This interpretation is based on Mallinātha's gloss on diṅnāgānāṃ pathi pariharan sthūla- hastāvalepān Me.14; which is, however, very doubtful.)

Derivable forms: diṅnāgaḥ (दिङ्नागः).

Diṅnāga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms diś and nāga (नाग).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Diṅnāga (दिङ्नाग).—n. of a teacher: Mvy 3481 (v.l. Dignāga; so Mironov with no v.l.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Diṅnāga (दिङ्नाग).—m.

(-gaḥ) An elephant of the quarter: see diggaja.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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