Dhutapapa, Dhūtapāpā, Dhūtapāpa, Dhuta-papa: 7 definitions

Introduction

Dhutapapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (D) next»] — Dhutapapa in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Dhūtapāpā (धूतपापा).—Name of a river originating from Himālaya, a holy mountain (kulaparvata) in Bhārata, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 85. There are settlements (janapada) where Āryas and Mlecchas dwell who drink water from these rivers.

Bhārata is a region south of Hemādri, once ruled over by Bharata (son of Ṛṣabha), whose ancestral lineage can be traced back to Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Dhūtapāpā (धूतपापा).—A river from the Himālayas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 26.

1b) A river in Kuśadvīpa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 61; Matsya-purāṇa 122. 71. Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 43.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Dhūtapāpā (धूतपापा) refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.17). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Dhūtapāpā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of dhutapapa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (D) next»] — Dhutapapa in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhūtapāpa (धूतपाप).—a. who has shaken off his sins, free from sin, pure.

Dhūtapāpa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dhūta and pāpa (पाप). See also (synonyms): dhūtakalmaṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhutapāpa (धुतपाप).—mfn.

(-paḥ-pā-paṃ) Purified from sin. E. dhuta shaken, pāpa sin.

--- OR ---

Dhūtapāpa (धूतपाप).—mfn.

(-ṣaḥ-ṣā-ṣaṃ) Pure, free from sin. E. dhūta shaken, pāpa sin.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhūtapāpa (धूतपाप).—(vb. dhū), adj. free from sin. Niṣpāpa, i. e.

Dhūtapāpa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dhūta and pāpa (पाप).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhutapāpa (धुतपाप):—[=dhuta-pāpa] [from dhuta > dhu] mfn. purified from sin, [Rāmāyaṇa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

2) Dhūtapāpa (धूतपाप):—[=dhūta-pāpa] [from dhūta > dhū] mfn. = -kalmaṣa, [Rāmāyaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] destroying sin, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

4) Dhūtapāpā (धूतपापा):—[=dhūta-pāpā] [from dhūta-pāpa > dhūta > dhū] f. Name of 2 rivers, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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