Dhusara, Dhūsara, Dhushara: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Dhusara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Dhusar.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Dhūsara (धूसर):—[dhūsaraḥ] Ash colour, Grey colour

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Dhūsara (धूसर) (lit. “one who is is smoky-coloured”) is a synonym (another name) for the Pigeon (Kapota), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Dhūsarā (धूसरा) is another name for Pāṇḍuraphalī an unidentified medicinal plant, possibly identified with either (1) Potarphalam, (2) Manamande (in Marathi) or (3) Pandurphalare (in Kannada), according to verse 5.130-131 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Dhūsarā and Pāṇḍuraphalī, there are a total of six Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Dhūsara (धूसर) refers to “dust-colored (powder)” (used for worship), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.39-45]—“[...] He worships with a mixture of white sandalwood, dust-colored powdered camphor (karpūra-kṣoda-dhūsara), seeds, grain, and sesame, [mixed together] with white sugar [that has been] combined with ghee and milk. All meditation done with effort and volition is the highest, etc. [and] causes one to thrive, etc. If, while [performing the agreed mediation], worshiping with Mṛtyujit [in mind, the king] obtains great peace [mahāśanti] instantly”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Dhūsara (धूसर) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Dhūsara] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dhusara in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

dhūsara : (adj.) dust-coloured; yellowish.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Dhūsara, (adj.) (Sk. dhūsara, Ags. dust=E. dust & dusk, Ger. dust; see dhvaṃsati & dhunoti & cp. Walde, Lat. Wtb. under furo) dust-coloured VvA.335. (Page 343)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dhūsara (धूसर).—a S Of a grey or dusky white, smokecolored.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर).—a. [dhū-sara kicca na ṣatvam Tv.]

1) Of a dusty, greyish or dusky-white colour, grey; शशी दिवसधूसरः (śaśī divasadhūsaraḥ) Bhartṛhari 2.56; Kumārasambhava 4.4,46; R.5.42;16.17; Śiśupālavadha 17.41.

-raḥ The gery colour.

2) A donkey.

3) A camel.

4) A pigeon.

5) An oilman.

6) Anything of a grey colour.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rī-raṃ) Grey, of that colour. m.

(-raḥ) 1. Grey, (the colour,) 2. A jack ass. 3. An oilman. 4. A camel. 5. A pigeon. 6. Any thing of a grey tint. f. (-rī) A female Kinnara or chorister of heaven. E. dhṛ to agitate (the mind,) sara Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर).—i. e. dhvaṃs + ara, I. adj., f. , Gray (like dust), [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 5, 42. Ii. f. , A small shrub, [Varāhamihira's Bṛhajjātaka.] S. 76, 6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर).—[adjective] dust-coloured, grey.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhūṣara (धूषर):—[wrong reading] for next.

2) Dhūsara (धूसर):—mf(ā)n. (√dhvaṃs, or dhvas; cf. dhvasira) dust-coloured, grey, [Kāvya literature; Rājataraṅgiṇī] etc. (-tva, n., [Dhūrtasamāgama])

3) m. grey (the colour), [Horace H. Wilson]

4) an ass, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) an oilman, [ib.]

6) a pigeon, [ib.]

7) a [particular] plant, [Varāha-mihira] (sweet vetch, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes])

8) Dhūsarā (धूसरा):—[from dhūsara] f. a kind of shrub, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर):—(raḥ) 1. m. Grey colour; a jackass; an oilman; a camel; a pigeon. f. Chorister of heaven. a. Grey, of a grey colour.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dhūsara (धूसर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dhūsara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dhusara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dhusara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर) [Also spelled dhusar]:—(a) dusty; dust-coloured.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Dhūsara (धूसर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Dhūsara.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Dhūsara (ಧೂಸರ):—

1) [adjective] of grey colour.

2) [adjective] of the colour of the blend of white and yellow.

--- OR ---

Dhūsara (ಧೂಸರ):—[noun] the colour between or made by mixing or blending white and black; grey.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of dhusara in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: