Dhatarattha, aka: Dhataraṭṭha, Dhātaratthā; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Dhatarattha means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Dhatarattha in Theravada glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

1. Dhatarattha - One of the Catummaharajika, the ruler of the Eastern Quarter. His followers are the Gandhabbas. He has numerous sons called Indra (D.ii.207, 220, 257f; iii.197). He was present at the preaching of the Mahasamaya Sutta and the Atanatiya Sutta. The name of his daughter is Siri (J.iii.257).

2. Dhatarattha - A mythical king, mentioned in a list of kings - with Vessamitta, Atthaka, Yamataggi, Usinnara and Sivi - as having entered Sakkas heaven by virtue of his righteousness and his waiting on pious men. J.vi.251.

3. Dhatarattha - There were two kings of this name, contemporaries and vassals of Renu. One of these two was king of Anga with his capital in Campa, and the other of the Kasis with his capital in Benares. D.ii.235f.

4. Dhatarattha - A Naga king. Thanks to the scheming of the tortoise Cittacula, he married Samuddaja, daughter of the king of Benares. They had four sons: Sudassana, Bhuridatta, Subhaga and Kanarittha. His kingdom was beneath the Yamuna. Dhatarattha is identified with Suddhodana. J.vi.162ff., 171.186, 200, 219. For details see the Bhuridatta Jataka.

5. Dhatarattha - The Bodhisatta born as king of the hamsas. He lived in Cittakuta, at the head of ninety thousand hamsas. One day he was caught in a snare on the lake Khema, set by the orders of King Bahuputtaka. Dhataratthas friend, Sumukha, refused to leave him while he was caught. The two friends melted the heart of the hunter when he came to take Dhatarattha, and later they were brought before the king. Dhatarattha preached the Doctrine to the king and to his queen, Khema, who longed to hear a hamsa preach (J.iv.425ff; for details see the Hamsa Jataka). Dhatarattha is often referred toe as a king surrounded by a splendid following. E.g., DA.i.40; MA.ii.576; UdA.57, 412; PvA.171.

6. Dhatarattha - The family of hamsas to which belonged Dhatarattha, king of the hamsas. The members of this family are called Dhatarattha. They were golden coloured and lived in Cittakuta. The Maha Sutasoma Jataka (J.v.345, 355, 357) contains a story of the complete destruction of these hamsas. They lived in Kancanaguha, and during the four months of the rainy season would not leave their cave, in case their wings should be drenched with water and they fell into the sea. A spider, as big as a cartwheel, used to weave a thick web at the entrance to the cave, but the Dhatarattha geese sent one of their young ones, who had received two portions of food, to cut through the web. One season, however, the rains lasted for four months, and the hamsas became cannibals and thus lost their strength. When, at the end of the rains, they tried to break through the web, they failed, and the spider cut off their heads one by one and drank their blood. This was the end of the Dhatarattha hamsas. J.v.469f.

7. Dhatarattha.

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A tribe of Nagas,Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Relevant definitions

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