Dhama, Dhāmā, Dhāman, Dhāma, Dhaman: 43 definitions

Introduction:

Dhama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

Dhāmā (धामा):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Randhra, the first seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (e.g. Dhāmā) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Dhāman (धामन्) or Paramadhāma refers to the “(highest) abode” (of Śiva), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 2.22cd-28ab]—“[...] That which is described is celebrated in the world as the supreme Amṛta [sa], this is the highest dwelling place (dhāmaetat tat paramaṃ dhāma). It is the highest Amṛta. Joined with the kalā nectar [visarga], filled with the splendor of the moon. It is the highest abode [of Śiva] (dhāma—etat tat paramaṃ dhāma). That is the supreme word. That is supreme strength, that is supreme amṛta. The highest of splendors is highest light of light. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Dhāma (धाम) is a Sanskrit technical term denoting a “residence” in general, according to the lists of synonyms given in the Mayamata XIX.10-12 and the Mānasāra XIX.108-12, both populair treatises on Vāstuśāstra literature.

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Dhāman (धामन्) refers to “temple, chapel § 4.2.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Dhāmā (धामा).—A hermit who protected Gaṅgā-Mahādvāra. (Mahābhārata, Udyoga Parva, Chapter 111, Stanza 17).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Dhāman (धामन्) refers to “abode” (viz., of Śiva), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.20. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] with these, his wife and his attendants Śiva reached his abode (dhāman) in the beauteous surroundings of the Himālayas with very great delight. After reaching his abode Śiva honoured the Devas and the great sages and then bade farewell to them with respect. Taking leave of Śiva eulogising and bowing to Him, Viṣṇu, as also the Gods and sages with joyful beaming faces returned to their respective abodes (dhāman)”.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Dhāma (धाम) refers to “abode” (residence), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.14 (“The Birth of Tāraka and Vajrāṅga”).—Accordingly, after Vajrāṅga spoke to Brahmā: “On hearing that, O sage, I said—‘Sāttvika feelings constitute the essence of real philosophy. I shall lovingly create an exquisite lady’. After offering her who was named Varāṅgī, to that son of Diti, I went to my abode [i.e., sva-dhāma] in great delight. So also Kaśyapa, his father. Thereafter the demon eschewed his diabolical feelings and resorted to sublime thoughts. Since he was free from fiendish feelings he became happy. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Dhama (धम).—A son of Śivadatta.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 35. 12.

2a) Dhāma (धाम).—Came out of the eyes of Atri: her son was Soma.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 23. 6-8. Vāyu-purāṇa 62. 41.

2b) An Amitābha God.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 53.

2c) A sage of the Tāmasa epoch.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 18.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Dhāmā (धामा) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.61.56) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Dhāmā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Dhāma (धाम) refers to “abode of Śrī Bhagavān in which He appears and enacts His divine pastimes”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Dhāma (धाम) refers to:—A holy place of pilgrimage; the abode of the Supreme Lord, where He appears and enacts His transcendental pastimes. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Dhāma (धाम) refers to:—The Lord’s abode. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (vaishnavism)

Dhāman (धामन्) refers to the “(threefold) splendour”, according to the Vedānta Deśika’s Yatirājasaptati.—When we come to the poem’s understanding of the divinity of Rāmānuja we find a wide spectrum of meanings. [...] Verse 27 lauds Rāmānuja as the aggregation of the threefold splendour (saṃvalita-tri-dhāman) of Agni (śikhāvat), the moon (auṣadhīśa) and the sun (tāpana). In verse 32 Rāmānuja is seen as having the same capacity to offer protection to the world as Viṣvaksena, with the latter’s cane staff transformed into his ascetic’s rod.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Dhaman in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Grewia optiva J.R.Drumm. ex Burret from the Tiliaceae (Phalsa) family having the following synonyms: Grewia oppositifolia. For the possible medicinal usage of dhaman, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Dhaman in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Cenchrus ciliaris L. from the Poaceae (Grass) family having the following synonyms: Pennisetum ciliare, Cenchrus longifolius.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Dhama [ਧਮਾ] in the Punjabi language is the name of a plant identified with Fagonia schweinfurthii (Hadidi) Hadidi from the Zygophyllaceae (Caltrop) family having the following synonyms: Fagonia indica var. schweinfurthii, Fagonia arabica var. schweinfurthii. For the possible medicinal usage of dhama, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Dhāman (धामन्) refers to an “abode”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala verse 3.11.40.—Accordingly, “The Kālī of menses who resounds in the abode of the triangle [i.e., trikoṇa-dhāman] with three parts which is (always) in menses in the three times is Nityaklinnā who makes the beautiful sound (of consciousness)”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Dhāman (धामन्) refers to the “abode” (where one never suffers again), according to Sāhib Kaul’s Śārikāstrotra.—Accordingly, “[...] He who recites after that syllable your name, Śārikā, followed by namaḥ, attains forever to that abode (dhāman) where, when reached, one never suffers again. I praise you; it is you in whom I take refuge. I serve the Goddess alone, the one power of all (powers). I utter my noisy stammering to you; I contemplate (you) who are everything, suitable for all, and everywhere. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Dhāman (धामन्) denotes in the Rigveda and later ‘dwelling’ and ‘house’, or sometimes its inmates. The word is also found in the sense of ‘ordinance’, ‘ law’, expressing much the same as Dharman, especially in conjunction with Ṛta, ‘eternal order’. Hillebrandt sees in one passage the sense of Nakṣatra.

Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Dhaman in India is the name of a plant defined with Arundo donax in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Scolochloa arundinacea (P. Beauv.) Mert. & Koch (among others).

2) Dhaman is also identified with Cenchrus biflorus It has the synonym Elymus caput-medusae Forssk., nom. illeg., non Elymus caput-medusae L. (etc.).

3) Dhaman is also identified with Cenchrus ciliaris It has the synonym Pennisetum cenchroides Rich., nom. illeg. (etc.).

4) Dhaman is also identified with Cenchrus echinatus It has the synonym Panicastrella muricata (L.) Moench (etc.).

5) Dhaman is also identified with Cordia macleodii It has the synonym Cordia macleodii Hook.f. & Thomson (etc.).

6) Dhaman is also identified with Grewia asiatica.

7) Dhaman is also identified with Grewia oppositifolia It has the synonym Grewia oppositifolia Buch.-Ham. ex Roxb..

8) Dhaman is also identified with Grewia optiva It has the synonym Grewia oppositifolia Roxb. & DC. (etc.).

9) Dhaman is also identified with Grewia tiliaefolia It has the synonym Grewia tiliifolia Vahl, nom. illeg. (etc.).

10) Dhaman is also identified with Pennisetum pedicellatum It has the synonym Eriochaeta densiflora Fig. & De Not. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Flora Brasiliensis (1878)
· The Flora of British India (1896)
· Cytologia (1989)
· Calcutta Journal of Natural History and Miscellany of the Arts and Sciences in India (1843)
· Hortus Bengalensis, or ‘a Catalogue of the Plants Growing in the Hounourable East India Company's Botanical Garden at Calcutta’ (1814)
· J. Tree Sci. (1982)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Dhaman, for example pregnancy safety, health benefits, side effects, diet and recipes, chemical composition, extract dosage, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

dhama : (adj. & n.) one who blows; a player (of a trumpet, etc.).

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Dhama, (-°) (adj.) (Sk. dhama, to dhamati) blowing, n. a blower, player (on a horn: saṅkha°) D.I, 251; S.IV, 322. (Page 335)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ḍhama (ढम) [or ढम्म, ḍhamma].—a (Imit.) Epithet of a person exceedingly dull and sluggish. 2 An interjection expressing a sudden twinge v kara. See hāya.

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dhama (धम).—m (Properly dhūma) The bass-end or bassmember (of the mṛdaṅga, sambaḷa &c.)

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dhāma (धाम).—f Epidemic disease. 2 Used fig. as our words Itch, rage, mania, cacoethes, furor, for a general or a great eagerness and excitation after.

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dhāma (धाम).—n S A house or dwelling-place; a place, spot, or seat of inherence. Ex. śrī rāmā maṅgaladhāmā tō nijadhāmāsa gēlā. 2 The body.

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dhāmā (धामा).—m Violent eagerness for or excitement about; as māgaṇyācā-jēvaṇyācā-raḍaṇyācā-dhāmā. See dhāma f Sig. II.

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dhāmā (धामा).—m C A mark impressed (by cowherds) on the hand or arm by applying ignited cowdung.

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dhāmā (धामा) [or म्या, myā].—m A term of opprobrium for a madhyaṃ- dina.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

dhāma (धाम).—f Epidemic disease. n A house or place. The body.

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dhāmā (धामा) [or -myā, or -म्या].—a Dirty.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhama (धम).—a. (-mā, -mī f.) [धम् ध्माने-अच् (dham dhmāne-ac)] (Usually at the end of comp.)

1) Blowing; अग्निंधम, नाडिंधम (agniṃdhama, nāḍiṃdhama).

2) Melting, fusing.

-maḥ 1 The moon.

2) An epithet of Kṛṣṇa.

3) Of Yama, the god of death.

4) Of Brahmā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāman (धामन्).—[neuter] seat, home, residence, realm (of the gods); wont or favourite place, thing, or person; inmates, family, troop, host (also [plural]); law, rule; custom, rite, manner; strength, power, majesty, splendour (also [plural]); [Name] of a Ṛṣi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāman (धामन्):—(ma) 5. n. The body; a house; dignity; pride; heroism; ray of light; place; birth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhama (धम):—[(maḥ-mā-maṃ) a.] One who blows. m. Moon; Krishna; Yama; Brahmā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhāman (धामन्):—[from dhā] n. dwelling-place, house, abode, domain, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc. ([especially] seat of the gods cf. madhyamaṃ dhāma viṣṇoḥ, [Śakuntalā [Pi. iv, 5]]; site of the sacred fire and the Soma, [Ṛg-veda] etc.; with priyam, favourite residence, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Brāhmaṇa])

2) [v.s. ...] favourite thing or person, delight, pleasure, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Atharva-veda; Brāhmaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] the inmates of a house or members of a family, class, troop, band, host (also [plural]), [Ṛg-veda] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] law, rule, established order ([especially] of Mitra-Varuṇa), [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda]

5) [v.s. ...] state, condition, [Prabodha-candrodaya i, 30]

6) [v.s. ...] manner, mode, tone, form, appearance ([especially] in sacrifice, song etc.), [Ṛg-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

7) [v.s. ...] effect, power, strength, majesty, glory, splendour, light, [Ṛg-veda] etc., [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] [according to] to some in [Ṛg-veda] also = muhūrta, ‘an hour’.

9) [v.s. ...] m. Name of one of the 7 Ṛṣis of the 4th Manv-antara ([varia lectio] dhātṛ), [Harivaṃśa]

10) [v.s. ...] cf. [Greek] θημον in εὐ-θήμων; θαμά, θωμός etc.; [Latin] fam-ulus; [Anglo-Saxon] dôm; [Gothic] domas; [German] tuom and [suffix] -tum.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhāman (धामन्).—n. [dhā-manin]

1) A dwelling-place, abode, residence, house; तुरासाहं पुरोधाय धाम स्वायंभुवं ययुः (turāsāhaṃ purodhāya dhāma svāyaṃbhuvaṃ yayuḥ) Kumārasambhava 2. 1,44; पुण्यं यायास्त्रिभुवनगुरोर्धाम चण्डीश्वरस्य (puṇyaṃ yāyāstribhuvanagurordhāma caṇḍīśvarasya) Meghadūta 33; Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 8.21; Bhartṛhari 1.35; पतत्यधो धाम विसारि सर्वतः किमेतदित्याकुलमीक्षितं जनैः (patatyadho dhāma visāri sarvataḥ kimetadityākulamīkṣitaṃ janaiḥ) Śiśupālavadha 1.2.

2) A place, site, resort; श्रियो धाम (śriyo dhāma); भूतैः स्वधामभिः पश्येदप्रविष्टं प्रविष्टवत् (bhūtaiḥ svadhāmabhiḥ paśyedapraviṣṭaṃ praviṣṭavat) Bhāgavata 7.12.15.

3) The inmates of a house, members of a family.

4) A ray of light; धाम्ना- तिशाययति धाम सहस्रधाम्नः (dhāmnā- tiśāyayati dhāma sahasradhāmnaḥ) Mu.3.17; Śiśupālavadha 9.53.

5) Light, lustre, splender; Mu.3.17; Kirātārjunīya 2.2,55,59;1.6; Amaruśataka 86; R.6.6;18.22

6) Majestic lustre, majesty, glory, dignity; गां गतस्य तव धाम वैष्णवं कोपितो ह्यसि मया दिदृक्षुणा (gāṃ gatasya tava dhāma vaiṣṇavaṃ kopito hyasi mayā didṛkṣuṇā) R.11.85.

7) Power, strength, energy (pratāpa); सहते न जनोऽप्यधःक्रियां किमु लोकाधिकधाम राजकम् (sahate na jano'pyadhaḥkriyāṃ kimu lokādhikadhāma rājakam) Kirātārjunīya 2.47.

8) Birth.

9) The body.

1) A troop, host.

11) State, condition; Prab.1.3.

12) A class.

13) Ved. Law, rule.

14) Ved. Property, wealth.

15) A fetter.

16) Fashion, mode, manner, form, appearance; स बिभ्रत्पौरुषं धाम भ्राजमानो यथा रविः (sa bibhratpauruṣaṃ dhāma bhrājamāno yathā raviḥ) Bhāgavata 1.2.17.

 

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhama (धम):—[from dhmā] mfn. blowing, melting (ifc.; cf. karaṃ-, khariṃ-, jalaṃetc.)

2) [v.s. ...] m. (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) the moon

3) [v.s. ...] Name of Brahman

4) [v.s. ...] of Yama

5) [v.s. ...] of Kṛṣṇa.

6) Dhāma (धाम):—[from dhā] 1. dhāma m. [plural] Name of a class of superhuman beings, [Mahābhārata]

7) [v.s. ...] n. abode etc. = dhāman, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] 2. dhāma in [compound] for man, below.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhama (धम).—[adjective] blowing, melting (—°).

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Dhāma (धाम).—[masculine] a kind of superhuman beings.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāman (धामन्).—[dhā + man], n. 1. An abode, Mahābhārata 1, 3602. 2. State, [Prabodhacandrodaya, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 17, 15. 3. A host, Chr. 292, 11, and 293, 6 = [Rigveda.] i. 85, 11; 87, 6. 4. Dignity, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 11, 85. 5. Light, splendour, [Prabodhacandrodaya, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 26, 8.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhama (धम).—[-dham + a] (vb. dhmā), latter part of comp. adj., Blowing, melting.

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Dhāma (धाम).— (akin to dhāman), m. pl. The name of a class of superhuman beings, Mahābhārata 13, 15446.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāman (धामन्).—n.

(-maḥ) 1. The body. 2. A house, a dwelling. 3. Dignity, consequence, eminence. 4. Spirit, pride, especially martial pride, heroism. 5. Light, splendour, radiance. 6. A ray of light. 7. A place, a spot, a country. 8. Birth. E. dhā to coutain, (life, a tenant, &c.) and manin aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhama (धम).—mfn.

(-maḥ-mā-maṃ) One who blows a fire or a trumpet. m.

(-maḥ) 1. A name of the moon. 2. Krishna. 3. A name of Yama. 4. Bramha, or the Supreme Spirit, E. dhmā to blow, affix ac .

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dhāman (धामन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dhāma.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dhama in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Dhama (धम) [Also spelled dham]:—(nf) a thud, report resulting from the fall of a heavy object or its movement on the ground; ~[dhama] recurrence of the sound of [dhama; —se] with a report or thud.

2) Dhāma (धाम) [Also spelled dham]:—(nm) residence, abode; seat of a diety; the four chief pilgrimage centres (of the Hindus).

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Dhama (धम) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Dhmā.

2) Dhāma (धाम) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Dhāman.

3) Dhāma (धाम) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Dhāman.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Dhāma (ಧಾಮ):—

1) [noun] a shelter; a house.

2) [noun] a particular area; a place.

3) [noun] a ray of light.

4) [noun] shining; lustre; sheen.

5) [noun] the dignity of a person; majesty; glory; splendour.

6) [noun] strength; power.

7) [noun] the body (of a living being).

8) [noun] a group of persons, animals or things.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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