Devayana, Devayāna, Deva-yana: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Devayana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Devayana in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Devayāna (देवयान).—As opposed to Pitṛyāna; the north road of the sun, situated to the north of Nāgavīthi and south of the Saptaṛṣiś; here live Siddhas and they have no rebirths;1 reached through the piṅgala passage (on the right side of the body);2 four roads to and the door of the sun leading to them;3 Śibi's lavish gifts to attain Devayāna.4

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 216; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 8. 90-7.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa II. 2. 24 [2]; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 169.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa I. 7. 183.
  • 4) Matsya-purāṇa 42. 19-20.

1b) Kaśyapa gotrakāras.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 199. 4.
Source: Institute of Buddhist Studies: Buddhist Forum, Volume 4 (itihasa)

Devayāna (देवयान).—The path to the underworld of the ancestors through the gateway of death is called the Pitṛyāna; from the epic period onwards this is increasingly seen as contrasting with the Devayāna which involves liberation from existence through wisdom (jñāna). This division into ancestral (lunar) and divine (solar) ‘vehicles’ corresponds to the two sects Śaiva and Vaiṣṇava: “Devayāna is Viṣṇu’s path, the path of the Pitṛyāna is dark; these are the two paths after death—the one leading upwards, the other below” (Mahābhārata XII, 315.30).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Institute of Buddhist Studies: Buddhist Forum, Volume 4 (buddhism)

Devayāna (देवयान, “divine vehicle”).—Buddhism in its earlier forms as a means for preventing rebirth through wisdom is a type of devayāna (divine vehicle) opposed to that which encourages continued transmigration. Encouragement for continued existence is provided by practices of the pitṛyāna (ancestral vehicle) type—practices which are sacrificial, which express gratitude for life, which generate more karma and rebirth, and which fuel saṃsāra.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Devayana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

devayāna : (nt.) the path to heaven; an air-ship.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Devayāna refers to: leading to the (world of) the gods, i.e. the road to heaven Sn.139, also in °yāniya (magga) D.I, 215;

Note: devayāna is a Pali compound consisting of the words deva and yāna.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Devayāna (देवयान).—bestowing मोक्ष (mokṣa); यज्ञस्य देवयानस्य मेध्याय हविषे नृप (yajñasya devayānasya medhyāya haviṣe nṛpa) Bhāg.8.8.2.

Devayāna is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms deva and yāna (यान).

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Devayāna (देवयान).—a celestial car.

Derivable forms: devayānam (देवयानम्).

Devayāna is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms deva and yāna (यान).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Devayāna (देवयान).—n.

(-naṃ) The car or vehicle of god. f. (-nī) The daughter of Sukra. E. deva a deity, and yāna going. yāyate anena yā-karaṇe lyuṭ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Devayāna (देवयान).—I. adj., f. , leading to the gods, Mahābhārata 3, 11000. Ii. n. 1. the road leading to the gods, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 7, 15, 55. 2. the vehicle of a god. Iii. f. , the daughter of Śukra, Mahābhārata 1, 3159.

Devayāna is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms deva and yāna (यान).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Devayāna (देवयान).—[feminine] ī going or leading to the gods; [feminine] ī [Name] of a daughter of Uśanas; [neuter] path of the gods.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Devayāna (देवयान):—[=deva-yāna] [from deva] mf(ī)n. = -yā, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

2) [v.s. ...] leading to the gods, serving them as a way (adhvan, pathin etc.), [ib.; Brāhmaṇa; Upaniṣad; Mahābhārata]

3) [v.s. ...] n. way leading to the gods, [Mahābhārata; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] the vehicle of a god, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Devayāna (देवयान):—[deva-yāna] (naṃ) 1. n. The car of a god. f. () Daughter of Shukra.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Devayāna (देवयान):—

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Devayāna (देवयान):——

1) Adj. (f. ī) — a) zu den Göttern gehend , — strebend. — b) Göttern zum Wandeln , Verkehr oder Aufenthalt dienend , zu den Göttern führend.

2) f. ī Nomen proprium einer Tochter des Uśanas. —

3) n. — a) Götterweg , der zu den Götter führende oder von ihnen begangene Weg. — b) *Götterwagen.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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