Devasvamin, aka: Devasvāmin, Deva-svamin; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Devasvamin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Devasvamin in Katha glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

1) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्) and Karambaka are two Brāhman brothers from Vetasa. Their story was narrated to Vasudattā (mother of Vararuci), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara chapter 2. Vararuci was an incarnation of Puṣpadanta (a subordinate of Śiva), who was cursed by Pārvatī for overhearing Śiva narrating the adventures of the seven vidhyādharas.

2) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्) is the son of Harisvāmin: a Brāhman from Ujjayinī, as mentioned in the fifth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 79. Accordingly, “... in Ujjayinī there lived an excellent Brāhman, the dear dependent and minister of King Puṇyasena, and his name was Harisvāmin. That householder had by his wife, who was his equal in birth, an excellent son like himself, Devasvāmin by name. And he also had born to him a daughter, famed for her matchless beauty, rightly named Somaprabhā”.

3) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्) is the name of a Brāhman from Vārāṇasī, as mentioned in the thirteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 87. Accordingly, “... there is a city of the name of Vārāṇasī, the abode of Śiva. In it there lived a Brāhman, named Devasvāmin, honoured by the king. And that rich Brāhman had a son named Harisvāmin; and he had an exceedingly lovely wife, named Lāvaṇyavatī”.

4) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्) is the name of a Brāḥman from Ujjayinī according to the eighteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 92. Accordingly, “... in that city [Ujjayinī] there was a learned Brāhman, named Devasvāmin, who had offered many sacrifices, and possessed great wealth, and who was highly honoured by the king, whose name was Candraprabha. In time there was born to that Brāhman a son, named Candrasvāmin, and he, though he had studied the sciences, was, when he grew up, exclusively devoted to the vice of gambling”.

5) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्) is the name of a Brāhman from Candrapura, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 123. Accordingly, “... there was in a town named Candrapura a Brāhman named Devasvāmin: he had a very beautiful daughter named Kamalalocanā; and he had a young Brāhman pupil named Kusumāyudha, and that pupil and his daughter loved one another well”.

6) Devasvāmin (देवस्वामिन्), son of Agnisvāmin, is the name of a Brāhman from Pāṭaliputra, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 124. Accordingly, “... there lived in Pāṭaliputra a Brāhman of the name of Agnisvāmin, a great maintainer of the sacrificial fire; and I am his son, Devasvāmin by name. And I married the daughter of a Brāhman who lived in a distant land, and because she was a child I left her in her father’s house”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Devasvāmin, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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