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Devagana, aka: Deva-gana, Devagaṇa; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Devagana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Devagaṇa (देवगण).—Thirty-three in number.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 80.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

In Buddhism

Pali

devagaṇa : (m.) a troop of gods.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

dēvagaṇa (देवगण).—m See this explained under manuṣyagaṇa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Relevant definitions

Search found 1068 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Deva
dēva (देव).—m A deity or god. Pr. mānalā tara dēva nāhīṃ tara dhōṇḍā An idol. dēva dēva karatā ...
Gana
gaṇa (गण).—m (S) A multitude, number, aggregate body: also an order, a genus, a class, a divisi...
Devayajna
dēvayajña (देवयज्ञ).—n Oblation of food to the gods.
Yakshagana
Yakṣagāna (यक्षगान).—In South Kanara the term ”Yakṣagāna“ refers both to a style of singing and...
Devaduta
Devadūta (देवदूत) refers to the “dwellers of heaven”; it is a Sanskrit technical...
Devayana
Devayāna (देवयान, “divine vehicle”).—Buddhism in its earlier forms as a means for preventing re...
Devagara
dēvāgāra (देवागार).—n S (Poetry.) An idol-house.
Nirmanadeva
Nirmāṇadeva (निर्माणदेव) means “the god Creator”. According to Śaivāgama texts, Śiva is at the ...
Devagriha
dēvagṛha (देवगृह).—n dēvaghara n An idol-house.
Devakula
Devakula (देवकुल).—Temples where dancing girls were entertained in service.** Matsya-purā...
Devavimana
Devavimāna (देवविमान, “vehicle”).—The twelfth of “fourteen dreams” of Triśalā.—The palanquin of...
Kuladeva
Kuladeva (कुलदेव).— The Kuladevas (Kuladevatās) are divinities worshipped in families from anci...
Satyadeva
Satyadeva (सत्यदेव).—One of the four classes of Gods (devas) according to Somasena in his Traiv...
Devalaya
Devālaya (देवालय).—The homes of the nine planets;1 temples visited by Paraśurāma;2 see ...
Devagiri
Devagiri is the name of a village mentioned in the “Khidrāpur stone inscripiton of the Yādava k...

Relevant text

Search found books containing Devagana, Deva-gana or Devagaṇa. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the most relevant articles:

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