Darva, Darvā, Dārvā, Dārva: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Darva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Dārva (दार्व).—A Kṣatriya king of the land called Dārvam. Opinion is divided as to whether Dārvam is the name of a land or of a caste. (Mahābhārata Sabhā Parva, Chapter 27, Verse 18).

2) Dārva (दार्व).—A country in Ancient India. Mention is made about this country in Mahābhārata, Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 9, Stanza 54.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Darva (दर्व).—A hill tribe;1 a mountain kingdom.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 67.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 114. 56; Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 136.

2) Darvā (दर्वा).—One of the wives of Uśinara and mother of Suvrata.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 18 and 20. Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 19.

3) Dārvā (दार्वा).—A degraded Kṣatriya clan.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 63. 140.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Darva (दर्व) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.24.17, II.48.12, III.174.12, VI.10.53, VIII.51.18) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Darva) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study (history)

Dārva (दार्व) is the name of a tribe mentioned as inhabiting the region around ancient Kaśmīra (Kashmir valley) according to the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Mahābhārata and the Purāṇas mention the Dārvas as a northern tribe along with the Daradas, the Śūras, the Audumbaras, the Kāśmīras, the Trigartas etc. They were inhabitants of Dārva identified with the districts of Jammu and Ballavar.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Darva (दर्व).—[dṛ-va]

1) A mischievous or harmful person (hiṃsra).

2) A demon, goblin.

3) A ladle.

4) Injury, hurt.

5) The hood of a snake.

Derivable forms: darvaḥ (दर्वः).

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Dārva (दार्व).—a. (-rvī f.) Wooden; अंसेऽधिदार्वी शिविका च यस्याम् (aṃse'dhidārvī śivikā ca yasyām) Bhāg.5.12.6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dārva (दार्व).—i. e. dāru + a (anomal.), I. adj., f. , Wooden, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 5, 12, 6. Ii. m. pl. The name of a people, Mahābhārata 2, 1026. Iii. f. , The name of several plants, Curcuma zantorhiza, [Suśruta] 2, 23, 14, etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Darva (दर्व).—[masculine] ladle, spoon.

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Dārva (दार्व).—[feminine] ī wooden.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Darva (दर्व):—[from darma] m. = vi, a ladle (cf. pūrṇa-darva), [Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra iv, 15, 19]

2) [v.s. ...] the hood of a snake, [Uṇādi-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

3) [v.s. ...] a Rakṣas, [ib.]

4) [v.s. ...] a mischievous man, rapacious animal, [Uṇādi-vṛtti]

5) [v.s. ...] See vi

6) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people (cf. dārva), [Mahābhārata ii, 1869; vi, 362; xiii, 2158]

7) Darvā (दर्वा):—[from darva > darma] f. Name of a daughter of Uśīnara, [Harivaṃśa 1675ff.; Vāyu-purāṇa ii, 37, 19.]

8) Dārva (दार्व):—[from dāru] mf(ī)n. wooden, [Purāṇa]

9) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a people (generally associated with the Abhi-sāras), [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa] etc.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Darva (दर्व):—[Uṇādisūtra 1, 155.]

1) = darvi Löffel [Śāṅkhāyana’s Gṛhyasūtrāṇi 4, 15.] Am Ende eines comp.: pūrṇadarva [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 2, 5, 3, 16.] —

2) = darvi Haube der Schlangen; vgl. vidarva . —

3) m. ein Rakṣas [UJJVAL.] —

4) m. Raubthier [UṆĀDIVṚ. im SAṂKṢIPTAS. Śabdakalpadruma] —

5) m. pl. Nomen proprium eines Volkes [Mahābhārata 2, 1869. 6, 362] [?(Viṣṇupurāṇa 192). 13, 2158.] Vgl. dārva . —

6) f. ā Nomen proprium einer Gemahlin des Uśīnara [Harivaṃśa 1675. 1677] (hier darbā). Nach [Viṣṇupurāṇa 444] ist dārvan (im Ind. darvan) ein Sohn Uśīnara’s.

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Dārva (दार्व):—

1) adj. (von 2. dāru) f. ī hölzern [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 5, 12, 6.] [BHAVIṢYOTTARAP.] in [morgenländischen Gesellschaft 6, 94, 4.] —

2) m. pl. Nomen proprium eines Volkes im NO. von Madhyadeśa [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 14, 30.] [Lassen’s Indische Alterthumskunde II, 138,] [Nalopākhyāna] [Mahābhārata 2, 1026.] [Harivaṃśa 782.] gewöhnlich mit den abhisāra zusammen genannt, [Mahābhārata 7, 3380] (dārvātisārāḥ). [8, 3652.] śīte dārvābhisārādau ṣaṇmāsānpārthivo vasat [Rājataraṅgiṇī 1, 180.] dārvābhisārādīndeśān [4, 711. 5, 141. 208. 7, 1293.] [Lassen’s Indische Alterthumskunde II, Anhang XXXIX. fg.] Vgl. darva, darvī . —

3) f. ā gaṇa nadyādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 2, 97.] —

4) f. ī Name verschiedener Pflanzen: a) = dāruharidrā, dāruniśā Curcuma aromatica Salisb., nach Andern C. xanthorrhiza; auch ein daraus bereitetes Kollyrium. [Amarakoṣa 2, 4, 3, 20.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1053.] [Medinīkoṣa v. 11.] [Ratnamālā 59.] [Suśruta 2, 23, 14. 68, 12. 107, 7. 256, 14. 418, 16. 1, 238, 13.] = haridrā [VIŚVA im Śabdakalpadruma] = haridrādvitaya zwei Arten von Haridrā [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 524.] — b) = gojihvikā [Medinīkoṣa] — c) = devadāru [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [VIŚVA.]

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Darva (दर्व):—[Z. 3 lies] vidarvya st. vidarva .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Darva (दर्व):——

1) m. — a) Löffel. — b) *die Haube einer Schlange. — c) *ein Rakṣas. — d) *Raubthier. — e) Nomen proprium — α) Pl. eines Volkes. v.l. dārva. — δ) eines Sohnes des Uśinara [VP.².4,121.] —

2) f. ā Nomen proprium der Gattin Uśinara's.

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Dārva (दार्व):——

1) Adj. (f. ī) hölzern.

2) m. Pl. Nomen proprium eines Volkes. Gewöhnlich in Verbindung mit den Abhisāra genannt. —

3) *f. ā gaṇa nadyādi. —

4) ī — a) Curcuma aromatica oder xanthorrhiza. Auch ein daraus bereitetes Collyrium. — b) * = gojihvikā. — c) *Pinus Deodora.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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