Darshita, Darśita: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Darshita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Darśita can be transliterated into English as Darsita or Darshita, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Darshit.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Darśita (दर्शित) refers to the “expounding (one’s philosophy)”, according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñāvimarśinī 1.181.—Accordingly, “And we have not taken the trouble of [detailing] here what these additional refuting arguments are; and the master Śaṅkaranandana has shown (darśita) [this] at length in his Prajñālaṅkāra”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Darśita (दर्शित) refers to “(that which) reveals (everything)” (through the attainment of Śiva), according to the Jayadrathayāmala, Ṣaṭka 1 verse 13.3–18::—Accordingly, “[...] Besides (bhūyas) the nirvāṇadīkṣā bestowing liberation is of many kinds: śivadharma-dīkṣā, lokadharma-dīkṣā and the initiation which kills quickly, causing the body to fall. [The initiation] which reveals everything through the attainment of Śiva (śivāpti-darśita-aśeṣā) through the performance of post-initiatory rites once the three bonds (i.e. the three impurities) have ceased due to the purification of the consciousness on one [of the six] paths, [that] initiation is known to be the śivadharmadīkṣā, which bestows the attainment of liberation because it is contrary to the mundane practice. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Darshita in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Darśita (दर्शित) refers to “revealing”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 225).—Accordingly, “[Then through the main entrance (of Caṇḍikā), the temple yard:] Her courtyard was adorned (vibhūṣita-aṅgaṇa) with thickets of red aśoka trees, the spaces between the branches of which were made gapless (nirantara) by flocks of perching red cockerels, [trees] which appeared to reveal unseasonal (akāla-darśita) clusters of blooms in their fear”

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Darśita (दर्शित) refers to “that which is dictated (in the scriptures)”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] O goddess! Having worshipped you I somehow manage to govern [my] land following the path dictated by the scriptures (āmnāya-darśita-patha). [But] who among the people on the path of winning the love of the young lady called Atibhavā—the one who has transcended the world—is not disrespected by those people who are engaged in gossip?”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Darśita (दर्शित) refers to “having been shown ”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Capable soul, for purification of the mind, you must hold strongly in the mind the reflections which are established by the gods of gods (i.e. the Tīrthaṅkaras) in the great scripture of the [Jain] canon [com.He explains (darśayati) that purpose for which (yadarthaṃ) they have been shown (darśitāḥ) by the Tīrthaṃkaras (tīrthaṃkaraiḥ)]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

darśita (दर्शित).—p S Seen.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

darśita (दर्शित).—n Seen.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Darśita (दर्शित).—p. p. [dṛś-ṇic-kta]

1) Shown, displayed, manifested, exhibited.

2) Explained, demonstrated, proved.

3) Apparent, visible.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Darśita (दर्शित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Visible, apparent. 2. Shown, displayed. 3. Explained. 4. Seen. 5. Understood. E. dṛś to see, in the causal form, affix ṇic and kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Darśita (दर्शित):—[from darśa] mfn. shown, displayed, exposed to view, [Rāmāyaṇa i; Meghadūta] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] explained, [Harivaṃśa 7289 etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Darśita (दर्शित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Visible, seen, shewn, explained, understood.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Darśita (दर्शित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Daṃsāvia, Daṃsia, Dakkhavia, Dakkhiya, Darisia, Dāia, Dāvia, Dekkhālia.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Darshita in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Darśita (दर्शित) [Also spelled darshit]:—(a) shown; displayed, exhibited; appeared.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Darśita (ದರ್ಶಿತ):—

1) [adjective] visually perceived; seen.

2) [adjective] shown; displayed; exhibited.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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