Darpita: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Darpita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Darpita in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Darpita (दर्पित) was a soldier in Sunītha and Sūryaprabha’s army whose strength is considered as equaling a double-power warrior (dviguṇaratha), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 47. Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... [Darpita, and others], these are all warriors of double power”.

The story of Darpita was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Darpita, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Darpita (दर्पित) refers to “haughty”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.16 (“Brahmā consoles the gods”).—Accordingly, as the Gods said to Brahmā: “O lord of the worlds, thanks to the boon received from you. The demon Tāraka is very haughty [i.e., darpita]. Driving us out with force he has taken possession of our positions. Is it not known to you what misery has befallen us? Please dispel our misery quickly. We seek refuge in you. He torments us wherever we happen to stay by day or at night. Wherever we flee we see Tāraka. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Darpita (दर्पित) refers to “(being) proud (of one’s strength)”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “An abnormal modification caused by a aggressive ritual against Kings, occurring at the improper time, dreadful and all-reaching, is characterized by the these signs: [...] frightful jackals enter unimpeded the innermost of the temple and howl loudly at the [morning and evening] twilights, when the sky is lit up; enemies proud of their strength (bala-darpita) besiege the King’s [capital] city; [...] from such and other signs he should understand that the enemy is performing a aggressive ritual”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Darpita (दर्पित).—&c. See under दृप् (dṛp).

See also (synonyms): darpa, darpaṇa.

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Darpita (दर्पित).—a. (-ṇī f.) Proud, arrogant, haughty.

See also (synonyms): darpin.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Darpita (दर्पित):—[from darpa] mfn. made proud, [Manu-smṛti viii; Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] proud (horses, frogs), [Mahābhārata iii; Suśruta; Bhartṛhari]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Darpita (दर्पित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dappia.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Darpita (ದರ್ಪಿತ):—[adjective] arrogant; insolent; overbearing; haughty.

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Darpita (ದರ್ಪಿತ):—[noun] = ದರ್ಪಿಷ್ಠ [darpishtha].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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