Dardara: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Dardara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Dardara (दर्दर) or Dardura refers to one of the major types of drums (puṣkara) according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 33. Dardura is also called ‘Dardara’. Possibly this is the right form of the name. One side of its wooden frame is covered with hide; it looks like a large gong. See also note 6 on XXVIII 4-5.

According to verse 33.242-244.—“the dardura should be like a bell sixteen fingers in diametre. Its face should be that of ghaṭa and should be twelve fingers in diametre, and have a fat lip on all sides”.

According to verse 33.274-275.—“Dāru is so called because of dārayati (one splits it up). And from the same Dardara originates”.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dardara (दर्दर).—a. Cracked, broken.

-raḥ 1 A mountain.

2) A jar slightly broken.

3) A band of music. (-) Robbing of grains.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Dardara (दर्दर) or Dadrula or Dardura or Dardula or Dradula.—adj. (all these spellings recorded in the mss.; compare Sanskrit dadruṇa, adj., Schmidt, Nachträge; from the noun Sanskrit dadru, Pali and AMg. daddu, a skin disease variously alleged to be leprosy or ringworm), afflicted with a skin- disease, leprosy or ringworm(?), in a list of adj. describing physical deformities, see quotations s.v. khoḍa, lame. Senart's readings vary and are not always related to the wildly varying readings of the mss., which I quote: Mahāvastu ii.150.9 darduro, dardaro; 152.3 dradulo (only one ms.); 153.19 dadrulaṃ, dradulaṃ; 156.12 dadrulaṃ, (da)rdulaṃ.

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Dardara (दर्दर).—variant for dadrula, q.v.

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Dardarā (दर्दरा).—[, see dardurā.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dardara (दर्दर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) Cracked, flawed, slightly broken, (a vessel, &c.) m.

(-raḥ) A mountain. E. dṝ to tear or break, affix ac, and the root repeated.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dardara (दर्दर).—[dardar + a] (anomal. [frequentative.] of dṛ10), m. The name of a mountain, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 91, 24, v. r.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dardara (दर्दर):—[from dara] mfn. broken, burst, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] m. ‘having caves’, a mountain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a ravine (?), [Rāmāyaṇa] (B) iv, 43, 27

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of drum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dardara (दर्दर):—(raḥ) 1. m. A mountain. a. Cracked.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dardara (दर्दर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Daddara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dardara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dardara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Dardara in Hindi refers in English to:—(a) coarsely ground, not well-ground, granulated; grating under the teeth; hence ~[hata] (nf)..—dardara (दरदरा) is alternatively transliterated as Daradarā.

context information

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