Dandika, Daṇḍika, Daṇḍikā, Dāṇḍika: 12 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Dandika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Source: Wisdom Library: Arthaśāstra

Dāṇḍika (दाण्डिक) refers to a “judicial functionary” and represents an official title used in the political management of townships in ancient India. Officers, ministers, and sovereigns bearing such titles [eg., Dāṇḍika] were often present in ancient inscriptions when, for example, the king wanted to address his subjects or make an important announcement. Dāṇḍika may be a judicial functionary but is most probably a police officer as the accompanying Dāṇḍapāśika is apparently the same as the modern Oriya Daṇḍuāsi, i.e. a village watchman.

Arthashastra book cover
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Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Daṇḍikā (दण्डिका) refers to a “short club” and represents one of the items held in the right hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, daṇḍikā]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Daṇḍika.—(HD), same as Daṇḍapāśika. See Vogel, Ant. Ch. St., p. 166. (CII 4), explained by some as a magistrate. Cf. Dāṇḍika. Note: daṇḍika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Dāṇḍika.—(CII 3; HD), a police officer. See Ind. Ant., Vol. XV, p. 306; CII, Vol. III, p. 216; Ep. Ind., Vol. XVII, p. 321. Generally Dāṇḍika and Dāṇḍapāśika are mentioned side by side (Ep. Ind., Vol. XVII, p. 231); probably the Dāṇḍika was the head of a group or outpost of the Dāṇḍapāśikas. Cf. Daṇḍika, Daṇḍ-oddharaṇika (collector of fines). Note: dāṇḍika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Daṇḍikā.—(SITI), also called daṇḍu; a palanquin. Note: daṇḍikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dandika in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

daṇḍika : (adj.) having a stick.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Daṇḍika (दण्डिक).—

1) A staff-bearer, a mace-bearer.

2) A kind of fish; also दण्डिका (daṇḍikā)

3) A policeman.

Derivable forms: daṇḍikaḥ (दण्डिकः).

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Daṇḍikā (दण्डिका).—

1) A stick.

2) A row, line, series.

3) A string of pearls, a necklace.

4) A rope.

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Dāṇḍika (दाण्डिक).—A chastiser, punisher; न च दण्डो न दाण्डिकः (na ca daṇḍo na dāṇḍikaḥ) Mb.12.59.14.

Derivable forms: dāṇḍikaḥ (दाण्डिकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍika (दण्डिक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A mace-bearer, &c. one carrying a stick or staff. 2. A fish, (Cyprinus dankena, Ham.) E. daṇḍa a staff, and ṭhan aff.

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Daṇḍikā (दण्डिका).—f.

(-kā) 1. A kind of necklace. 2. A string. E. daṇḍa a measure, and ikan aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍika (दण्डिक).—i. e. daṇḍa + ika, adj. One who chastises, Mahābhārata 6, 439.

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Dāṇḍika (दाण्डिक).—i. e. daṇḍa + ika, adj., f. , Punishing; m. A chastiser, Mahābhārata 12, 2135.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍika (दण्डिक).—[adjective] chastising, punishing; [masculine] staffbearer, police officer.

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Dāṇḍika (दाण्डिक).—[adjective] inflicting punishment, punishing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Daṇḍikā (दण्डिका):—[from daṇḍaka > daṇḍa] f. a stick, staff, [Manu-smṛti v, 99; Manvarthamuktāvalī, kullūka bhaṭṭa’s Commentary on manu-smṛti] (ifc.)

2) [v.s. ...] a line, [Naiṣadha-carita i, 21 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

3) [v.s. ...] a rope, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a string of pearls, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Daṇḍika (दण्डिक):—[from daṇḍa] mfn. ([gana] purohitādi) carrying a stick, [Pāṇini v, 2, 115; Kāśikā-vṛtti; iii, 1, 7; Kāraṇḍa-vyūha [Scholiast or Commentator]]

6) [v.s. ...] = dāṇḍ, [Mahābhārata vi, 439]

7) [v.s. ...] m. a policeman, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a fish, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] m. (also) a kind of arrow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Dāṇḍika (दाण्डिक):—[from dāṇḍa] mf(ī)n. inflicting punishment, punishing, [Mahābhārata xii, 2135]

11) [v.s. ...] m. punisher, [Pāṇini 4-4, 12 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Daṇḍika (दण्डिक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A mace bearer; a fish (Cyprinus).

2) Daṇḍikā (दण्डिका):—(kā) 1. f. A necklace, a string.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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