Dandanayaka, Daṇḍanāyaka, Danda-nayaka: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Dandanayaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Dandanayaka in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक).—An attendant of Śiva posted in Benares to oust sinners from its precincts.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 185. 47-50, 66.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of dandanayaka in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Source: Shodhganga: Kakati Ganapatideva and his times (artha)

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक) can be defined as a general who was in charge of the civil and military departments. He may also be appointed as the governor of a province in which capacity he could act as the head of the civil and military departments. Bṛhaspati states that the queen, yuvarāja, senāpati and daṇḍanāyaka are placed on the same level in the matter of staff (daṇḍa) to be prepared for them.

Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

Discover the meaning of dandanayaka in the context of Arthashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Daṇḍanāyaka.—(IE 8-3; EI 30; CII 4; BL), probably a translation of Greek Strategos; a general; a leader of forces, an army officer; a military commander; also called Daṇḍa- nātha, Daṇdanetṛ, etc.; sometimes also called Mahāsāmanta, Senādibāhattaraniyogādhiṣṭhāyaka, Mahāpradhāna, Sarvādhikārin, Mahāpasāyita, etc., additionally; see Mahādaṇḍanāyaka, Sarva- daṇḍanāyaka, Mahāsarvadaṇḍanāyaka. (LP), generally, the viceroy or governor of a province; representative of the king. (ASLV), the commander of forces and officer in charge of administration; title of the provincial governors; similar to the Mansabdār of the Mughal period. (HD), a prefect of the police, according to Stein (Rāja- taraṅgiṇī, VII. 951); ‘a General or Magistrate’, according to some (cf. Kielhorn's Southern List, Nos. 291, 292, 296). In the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (7. 2-4), the queen, Yuvarāja, Senāpati and Daṇḍanāyaka are placed on the same level in the matter of the staff (daṇḍa) to be prepared for them. Cf. Taḍeya-daṇḍanāyaka, explained as ‘the general in charge of reserves’, from Kannaḍa, taḍĕ, ‘far, restraint’. Note: daṇḍanāyaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

--- OR ---

Dāṇḍanāyaka.—(EI 23; HD), same as Daṇdanāyaka. See Ep. Ind., Vol. XIX, p. 269. Note: dāṇḍanāyaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of dandanayaka in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Dandanayaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक).—

1) a judge, a head police-officer, a magistrate.

2) the leader of an army, a general.

3) a king. °पुरुषः (puruṣaḥ) a policeman, constable.

Derivable forms: daṇḍanāyakaḥ (दण्डनायकः).

Daṇḍanāyaka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms daṇḍa and nāyaka (नायक).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. General, a commander-in-chief. 2. A magistrate, a head police officer. E. daṇḍa a column of troops, and nāyaka a leader.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक).—m. I. a judge, [Hitopadeśa] 66, 6. 2. the commander of a division of an army, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 7, 969. Bhūta-nāyikā, f. Durgā.

Daṇḍanāyaka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms daṇḍa and nāyaka (नायक).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक).—[masculine] judge (bearer of the rod).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक):—[=daṇḍa-nāyaka] [from daṇḍa] m. ‘rod-applier’, a judge, [Hitopadeśa ii, 9, 0/1 and 4/5]

2) [v.s. ...] = -mukha, [Jaina literature; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā lxxiii, 4; Rājataraṅgiṇī vii]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of an attendant of the Sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc. [Scholiast or Commentator]]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Daṇḍanāyaka (दण्डनायक):—(da + nā) m.

1) Richter [Hitopadeśa 66, 6. fgg.] puruṣa Polizeidiener, Scherge Schol. in der Einl. zu [Caurapañcāśikā] —

2) Anführer einer Heeressäule, einer Kolonne: senāpatidaṇḍanāyakāḥ [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 71, 4.] [Rājataraṅgiṇī 7, 969. 976. 988. 994. 1158. 1161. 1167. 1317. 1320. 1553. 1598. 1612. 1631] (nach [TROYER] überall Nomen proprium). = senāpati Oberbefehlshaber der Armee, General [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 725.] —

3) Nomen proprium eines Wesens im Gefolge des Sonnengottes [VYĀḌI] zu [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 103.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of dandanayaka in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: