Danavari, aka: Dānavāri, Dana-vari, Danava-ari; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Danavari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Danavari in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Dānavāri (दानवारि) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Bāḍabāmukha, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. Alternatively, this deity could be Anala. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Dānavāri) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Danavari in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Dānavāri (दानवारि).—n., ichor flowing from the temples of elephants.

Dānavāri is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dāna and vāri (वारि).

--- OR ---

Dānavāri (दानवारि).—

1) a god.

2) an epithet of Viṣṇu.

Derivable forms: dānavāriḥ (दानवारिः).

Dānavāri is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dānava and ari (अरि).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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