Damshtra, Daṃṣṭra, Damstra, Daṃṣṭrā, Damshtraka: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Damshtra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Daṃṣṭra and Daṃṣṭrā can be transliterated into English as Damstra or Damshtra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा):—Ayurvedic term for poisonous teeth which is counted as site of poison and medium of spreading poison / infection by the way bite of animal.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Damshtra in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा).—A daughter of Krodhavaśa and a wife of Pulaha;1 gave birth to lions, tigers, elephants, etc.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 172; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 205.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 412.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र) refers to “teeth”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Oṃkāra is the great sacred seat within the face as a whole. The sky (ka) is the head there and is (the sacred seat) called Jāla. The one called Pūrṇa is in the (group of four) called the eye. The one called Kāma is within the teeth [i.e., daṃṣṭra-antara]. [...]”.

2) Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र) refers to “one who has sharp teeth” and is used to visualize Bhairava, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “He has eight faces and, very powerful, shines like a white lotus. He is mightily proud and has sharp teeth [i.e., daṃṣṭra-utkaṭa] and great body. He is terrible and fierce and his face is deformed. O Śambhu, he has twenty arms and the goddess sits on his lap. He holds a sword, mallet and noose, a double-headed drum, a dagger, the Kaustubha jewel, a rosary, a skull bowl full of fruit and the like and a piece of human flesh. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र) refers to “one having sharp teeth” and is used to describe Svacchanda, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. [...] O beautiful lady, this, the western one, is yellow like vermillion mixed with musk. Divine, it generates great energy. (The southern face) is somewhat fierce with large sharp teeth [i.e., daṃṣṭra-karāla] and long red eyes. It is blue like a blue lotus and blue collyrium. Beautiful and fierce, he wears a gem and a snake and his hair is brown. He is called Aghora, contemplating (him) he bestows success in every enterprise”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र) denoting a prominent tooth, ‘tusk’, or ‘fang’ of an animal, occurs often from the Rigveda onwards.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र) refers to “fangs (of Yama)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Fools mourn for relations experiencing the results of their own actions [but] because of the confusion of [their] intelligence [they do] not [mourn for] themselves situated in Yama’s fangs (yama-daṃṣṭra-antarasthita). In this forest that is the cycle of rebirth dwelt in by Yama the serpent-king, the men of olden times, who were eternal previously, have come to an end”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा).—[daṃś-ṣṭran ṭāp] A large tooth, tusk, fang; Rām. 2.7.2; प्रसह्य मणिमुद्धरेन्मकरवक्त्रदंष्ट्राङ्कुरात् (prasahya maṇimuddharenmakaravaktradaṃṣṭrāṅkurāt) Bhartṛhari 2.4; R.2.46; दंष्ट्राभङ्गं मृगाणामधिपतय इव व्यक्तमानावलेपा नाज्ञाभङ्गं सहन्ते नृवर नृपतयस्त्वादृशाः सार्वभौमाः (daṃṣṭrābhaṅgaṃ mṛgāṇāmadhipataya iva vyaktamānāvalepā nājñābhaṅgaṃ sahante nṛvara nṛpatayastvādṛśāḥ sārvabhaumāḥ) || Mu.3.22.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा).—f.

(-ṣṭrā) A large tooth, a tusk. E. daṃś to bite, affix ṣṭran, and ṭāp fem. aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र).—i. e. daṃś + tra, n. and f. , A tusk, a large tooth, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 39, 11; [Pañcatantra] 55, 15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र).—[masculine] daṃṣṭrā [feminine] large tooth, tusk, fang.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र):—[from daṃś] m. a large tooth, tusk, fang, [Ṛg-veda ii, 13, 4; x, 87, 3; Atharva-veda] etc.

2) Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा):—[from daṃṣṭra > daṃś] a f. ([gana] ajādi & [Pāṇini 3-2, 182]) idem, [Śikṣā; Mahābhārata etc.]

3) Daṃṣṭra (दंष्ट्र):—[from daṃś] cf. ayo-, aṣṭa-, aṣṭā-, catur-, tīkṣṇa-, bhagna-, raudra-, su-.

4) Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा):—[from daṃś] b f. of ra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃṣṭrā (दंष्ट्रा):—(ṣṭrā) 1. f. A large tooth, a tusk.

[Sanskrit to German]

Damshtra in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Daṃṣṭra (ದಂಷ್ಟ್ರ):—[noun] a protruded, usu. one of a pair, tooth, as of an elephant, wild boar, etc., which is used as a weapon of self-defence, as a tool for digging, etc.; a tusk.

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Daṃṣṭraka (ದಂಷ್ಟ್ರಕ):—[noun] = ದಂಷ್ಟ್ರ [damshtra].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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