Damsha, Daṃśa, Ḍaṃsa, Damsa: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Damsha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Daṃśa can be transliterated into English as Damsa or Damsha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Dance.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Daṃśa (दंश):—Biting

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Daṃśa (दंश).—The giant who took birth as the worm 'Alarkkaṃ'. This giant came in the shape of a beetle and pierced the leg of Karṇa, the disciple of Paraśurāma. Daṃśa once kidnapped the wife of Bhṛgu, and the hermit cursed the giant and turned him to a beetle. He also said that Parameśvara would absolve him from the curse. (See Karṇa, Para 4).

Source: valmikiramayan.net: Srimad Valmiki Ramayana

Daṃśa (दंश) refers to “mosquitoes”, according to the Rāmāyaṇa chapter 2.28. Accordingly:—“[...] soothening with kind words to Sītā, when eyes were blemished with tears, the virtuous Rāma spoke again as follows, for the purpose of waking her turn back: ‘[...] Oh, frail princess! Flying insects, scorpions insects including mosquitoes (daṃśa) and flies always annoy every one. Hence, forest is full of hardship’”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Daṃśa (दंश, lit., ‘biter’), ‘gad-fly’ is mentioned in the Chāndogya-upaniṣad (vi. 9, 3; 10, 2).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Daṃśa (दंश) refers to “stinging insects” and represents one of the  hardships (parīṣaha), or “series of trials hard to endure” according to the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra 10.1 (Incarnation as Nandana). While practicing penance for a lac of years, Muni Nandana also endured a series of trials hard to endure (e.g., daṃśa). Nandana is the name of a king as well as one of Mahāvīra’s previous births.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ḍaṃsa : (m.) a gadfly.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ḍaṃśa (डंश).—m (daṃśa S) The bite or sting of a venomous creature. v kara, māra. 2 fig. Rancour, malice, hate. v rākha, ṭhēva, dhara.

--- OR ---

ḍāṃsa (डांस).—m (daṃśa S through () A large stinging fly, a gadfly. 2 A mosquito. 3 or ḍāsa m C or ḍāsā m C A morsure or bite. v ghē. 4 The part bitten.

--- OR ---

daṃśa (दंश).—m (S) Stinging or biting. 2 A morsure or bite. 3 fig. The point or sting (of a speech or of an affair). 4 fig. Spite, malice, rancor. 5 fig. A perplexing passage (in a book). 6 A gadfly.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ḍaṃśa (डंश).—m The bite or sting of a venomous creature. Rancour, malice.

--- OR ---

ḍāṃsa (डांस).—m A large stinging fly, a gadfly. A mosquito.

--- OR ---

daṃśa (दंश).—a A bite. Stinging. Fig. Spite, malice, rancour. The point or sting (of a speech or an affair).

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Daṃśa (दंश).—[daṃś-aca bhāve ghañ vā]

1) Biting, stinging; मुग्धे विधेहि मयि निर्दयदन्तदंशम् (mugdhe vidhehi mayi nirdayadantadaṃśam) Gīt.1.

2) The sting of a snake.

3) A bite, the spot bitten; छेदो दंशस्य दाहो वा (chedo daṃśasya dāho vā) M.4.4; U.3.35.

4) Cutting, tearing.

5) A gad-fly; R.2.5; Ms.1.4; Y.3.215.

6) A flaw, fault, defect (in a jewel).

7) A tooth; प्रुत्युप्तमन्तः सविषश्च दंशः (prutyuptamantaḥ saviṣaśca daṃśaḥ)

8) Pungency.

9) An armour; शितविशिखहतो विशीर्णदंशः (śitaviśikhahato viśīrṇadaṃśaḥ) Bhāg.1.9.38.

1) A joint, limb.

Derivable forms: daṃśaḥ (दंशः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃśa (दंश).—m.

(-śaḥ) 1. A gadfly. 2. A tooth. 3. Biting, stinging. 4. Armour, mail. 5. Cutting, dividing, tearing. 6. Fault, defect. 7. A joint, a limb. 8. The sting of a snake. 9. Pungency. f. (-śī) A small gadfly. E. daṃś to bite or sting, affix ac, diminutive affix ṅīṣ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃśa (दंश).—[daṃś + a], m. 1. Biting, [Gītagovinda. ed. Lassen.] 10, 11. 2. Bite, [Mālavikāgnimitra, (ed. Tullberg.)] 47, 4. 3. A tooth, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 5, 13, 3. 4. A gad-fly, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 12, 62. 5. A coat of mail, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 3, 18, 9. 6. A proper name, Mahābhārata 12, 93.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃśa (दंश).—[masculine] biting, a bite or the spot bitten; gadfly; armour, mail.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Daṃśa (दंश):—[from daṃś] mfn. ‘biting’ See mṛga-

2) [v.s. ...] m. a bite, sting, the spot bitten (by a snake etc.), [Suśruta; Mālavikāgnimitra iv, 4 & 4/5, 3; Gīta-govinda x, 11; Kathāsaritsāgara lx, 131]

3) [v.s. ...] snake-bite, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] pungency, [Horace H. Wilson]

5) [v.s. ...] a flaw (in a jewel), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a tooth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a stinging insect, gnat, gad-fly, [Chāndogya-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti xii, 62; Yājñavalkya iii, 215; Mahābhārata] etc.

8) [v.s. ...] Name of an Asura, [xii, 93]

9) [v.s. ...] armour, mail, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa i, iii]

10) [v.s. ...] a joint of the body, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [from daṃś] cf. kṣamā-, vṛṣa-.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Daṃśa (दंश):—(śaḥ) 1. m. A gadfly; a tooth; a biting; a sting; a fault; pungency; mail. f. (śī) Small gadfly.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Daṃśa (दंश) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ḍaṃsa, Daṃsa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Damsha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Ḍāṃsa (डांस) [Also spelled dance]:—(nm) a kind of large-sized mosquito.

2) Daṃśa (दंश) [Also spelled dansh]:—(nm) a sting; bite, biting; ~[na] stinging, biting; [daṃśita] bitten, stung.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ḍaṃsa (डंस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Daṃś.

2) Ḍaṃsa (डंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Daṃśa.

3) Ḍaṃsa (डंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Daṃśa.

4) Daṃsa (दंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Darśa.

5) Daṃsa (दंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Daṃś.

6) Daṃsa (दंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Daṃśa.

7) Daṃsa (दंस) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Darśa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Daṃśa (ದಂಶ):—

1) [noun] the act of biting or stinging; a bite.

2) [noun] a kind of fly that bites; a gadfly.

3) [noun] a wound caused by biting.

4) [noun] a tooth or stinging organ.

--- OR ---

Daṃsa (ದಂಸ):—[noun] = ದಂಶ - [damsha -] 2.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of damsha or damsa in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: