Dalita, Dālita: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Dalita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Dalit.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Dalita (दलित) refers to “blooming” (viz., of a flower), as mentioned in a list of twenty-six synonyms, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Dalita] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

dālita : (pp. of dāleti) see dāreti.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dalita (दलित).—p S Ground. 2 Broken or reduced to pieces gen.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

dalita (दलित).—n Ground. Broken or reduced to pieces gen.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dalita (दलित).—p. p. [dal-kta]

1) Broken, torn, rent, burst, split, ground; दलितमौक्तिकचूर्णविपाण्डवः (dalitamauktikacūrṇavipāṇḍavaḥ) Śiśupālavadha 6.35.

2) Opened, expanded.

3) Bisected.

4) Driven asunder, dispelled, scattered.

5) Trodden down, crushed, destroyed.

6) Manifested, displayed; Prab.2.35.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dalita (दलित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Blown, full blown, expanded. 2. Broken, split. 3. Cut to pieces. 4. Torn, rent. 5. Scattered, driven apart, divided. 6. Opened, unfolded. E. dal to split, affix kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dalita (दलित):—[from dalana > dal] mfn. ([gana] kṛtādi, [Gaṇa-pāṭha]) burst, split, broken, torn asunder, [Mahābhārata viii, 4633; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Bhartṛhari] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] unfolded, blown, [Sāhitya-darpaṇa x, 66 a/b]

3) [v.s. ...] halved, [Sūryasiddhānta iv, 12]

4) [v.s. ...] divided into degrees, [xiii, 5 f].

5) [v.s. ...] driven asunder, scattered, dispersed, destroyed, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra; Bhaktāmara-stotra 1 and 18; Caurapañcāśikā; Prabodha-candrodaya vf.; BrahmôttKh. iv, 59]

6) [v.s. ...] ground, [Śiśupāla-vadha vi, 35]

7) [v.s. ...] displayed, [Prabodha-candrodaya ii, 35]

8) [v.s. ...] cf. saṃ-.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dalita (दलित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Blown, expanded; broken torn, scattered.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dalita (दलित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dalia.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Dalita (दलित) [Also spelled dalit]:—(a) downtrodden; depressed; ~[varga] a depressed class.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Dalita (ದಲಿತ):—

1) [adjective] split; broken; divided.

2) [adjective] blown (as a flower).

--- OR ---

Dalita (ದಲಿತ):—

1) [noun] the fact or condition of being depressed, deprived of.

2) [noun] a man who is deprived of his social status, opportunities, etc. and hence remained poor.

3) [noun] (math.) a dividing of a quantity by another quantity; division.

--- OR ---

Daḷita (ದಳಿತ):—

1) [adjective] split; broken; divided.

2) [adjective] blown (as a flower).

--- OR ---

Daḷita (ದಳಿತ):—

1) [noun] the fact or condition of being depressed, deprived of.

2) [noun] a man who is deprived of his social status, opportunities, etc. and hence remained poor.

3) [noun] (math.) a dividing of a quantity by another quantity; division.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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