Curnaka, Cūrṇaka: 5 definitions

Introduction

Curnaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Churnaka.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Cūrṇaka (चूर्णक) refers to one of the three types of gadya according to Candraśekhara’s Vṛttamauktika 6.1-2. As the metres are used in padyas, there are also metres, prescribed for gadyas. Candraśekhara (author of Vṛttamauktika) divides the whole vāṅmaya in two groups i.e. padya and gadya. He defines gadya as the composition, which is distracted with pāda. He again divides the gadya into three viz. Cūrṇaka, Utkalikāprāya and Vṛttagandhi.

Description of Cūrṇaka: The composition which is an assembly of soft words and composed by use of less compound words is called as cūrṇaka. And it becomes more pleasant if written in vaidarbhī style (rīti).  But Candraśekhara, goes one step further and implies his views on gadya by dividing the cūrṇaka into three viz. 1. Āviddhacūrṇa, 2. Lalitacūrṇa, 3. Mugdhacūrṇa. The Mugdhacūrṇa is further divided into two i.e. 1. Avṛttimugdhacūrṇa, 2. Atyalpavṛttimugdhacūrṇa..

2) Cūrṇaka according to the Chandomañjarī 6.1 by Gaṅgādāsa (16th century):—The composition which is an assembly of soft words and composed by less use of compound words is called as cūrṇaka. This will be more beautiful if it is written in vaidarbhī style (rīti).

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cūrṇaka (चूर्णक).—[cūrṇa svārthe ka]

1) Grain fried and pounded.

2) A species of silk-cotton tree (śālmalīviśeṣa); अङ्कोलाश्च कुरण्टाश्च चूर्णकाः पारिभद्रकाः (aṅkolāśca kuraṇṭāśca cūrṇakāḥ pāribhadrakāḥ) Rām.4.1.8.

-kam 1 A fragrant powder.

2) A style of prose-composition which is easy, does not contain hard letters, and has very few compounds; अकठोराक्षरं स्वल्पसमासं चूर्णकं विदुः (akaṭhorākṣaraṃ svalpasamāsaṃ cūrṇakaṃ viduḥ) Chand. M.6.

3) Explaining in prose the purport of a foregoing verse.

Derivable forms: cūrṇakaḥ (चूर्णकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cūrṇaka (चूर्णक).—m.

(-kaḥ) Grain fried and pounded. n.

(-kaṃ) Expounding in prose the purport of a foregoing verse, an order or interpretation in prose not abounding in compound words. E. kan added to the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cūrṇaka (चूर्णक):—[from cūrṇ] m. a kind of Ṣaṣṭika grain, [Suśruta i, 46, 1, 5]

2) [v.s. ...] chalk-like paleness, [Caraka v, 1 and 12]

3) [v.s. ...] grain fried and pounded, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] n. fragrant powder, [Suśruta vi, 35, 5]

5) [v.s. ...] a kind of easy prose (expounding the purport of a foregoing verse, [Horace H. Wilson]), [Chandomañjarī]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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