Cuda, Cūḍā: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Cuda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chuda.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Google Books: Manusmṛti with the Manubhāṣya

Cūḍā (चूडा) is the tuft of hair on the crown of the bead’; and the ceremony for the purpose of this is called ‘Cūḍā-karman,’ ‘Tonsure’; this name ‘Tonsure’ is given to that ceremony which consists in the cutting of the hair in such a manner as to leave well-arranged tufts of hair on certain parts of the head. This may be done ‘in the first year or the third’;—this option being due to considerations of the good and evil aspects of planets.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Cūḍa (चूड) refers to a “crest”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] May the goddess Kāmeśvarī, who dwells at the front angle [of the central triangle], give me all objects of my desire. She is three-eyed, her eyes are beautiful and her limbs are ruddy. She has the crescent moon on her crest (taruṇendu-cūḍā). She looks beautiful with her four hands marked with a snare together with a goad, a plate with the nectar of immortality, the gesture of boon-giving, and the gesture of safety. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Cūḍa (चूड) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Cūḍa] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Cūḍā.—(IA 11), the top knot of hair; cf. cūḻā. Note: cūḍā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

cuḍā (चुडा).—m (cūḍā S) A bracelet. 2 fig. The state of a married woman, in opp. to widowhood. Because on the death of her husband a woman ceases to wear ornaments. See cūḍā. Also for cuḍāmaṇī see cūḍāmaṇī. cuḍā bharaṇēṃ (To put on bracelets--to become a female. ) To flinch, falter, fail, yield, to fall back cowardly.

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cūḍa (चूड).—f A torch of wisps, or of sprigs and twigs, or of branches of the Cocoanut &c. 2 A term (from its shining appearance) for the serpent called kāṃ- ḍāra. 3 n A tuft of rice-plants (as in the hand of the person resetting them). cūḍa ucalaṇēṃ-dharaṇēṃ-lāvaṇēṃ To raise or set against one a false accusation.

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cūḍā (चूडा).—f (S) The lock of hair left on the crown of the head at the ceremony of tonsure, the Shenḍi 2 A peacock's crest; any crest, tuft, or plume. 3 fig. Top, crown, summit.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

cuḍā (चुडा).—m A bracelet; fig. the state of a married woman, in opposition to widowhood. cuḍēdāna māgaṇēṃ Ask for the life of a husband. cuḍā bharaṇēṃ To falter, fall back cowardly.

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cūḍa (चूड).—f A torch of wisps, or of sprigs and twigs. cūḍa lāvaṇēṃ Raise against one a false accusation.

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cūḍā (चूडा).—f The lock of hair left on the crown of the head at the ceremony of ton- sure. Fig. Crown. Crest.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cūḍa (चूड).—Ved.

1) A protuberance.

2) The ceremony of tonsure.

Derivable forms: cūḍaḥ (चूडः).

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Cūḍā (चूडा).—

1) The hair on the top of the head, a single lock on the crown of the head (left after the ceremony of tonsure); R.18.51; U.5.36;5.3;4.2.

2) The ceremony of tonsure.

3) The crest of a cock or peacock; Pt.2.73.

4) Any crest, plume or diadem.

5) The head.

6) Top, summit.

7) A room on the top of a house.

8) A well.

9) An ornament (like a bracelet worn on the wrist).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Cūḍa (चूड).—adj. (= Pali cūḷa; compare culla, cūlla), small, petty, insignificant; always followed by paramacūḍa, and followed or preceded by dhanva (for dhandha, q.v.) and parama- dhanva: Divyāvadāna 488.26; 489.19; 490.7, 19; 492.21; 504.18.

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Cūḍā (चूडा).—(compare JM.cūlā, seemingly used in the general sense of ornament, see [Paia-sadda-mahaṇṇavo] s.v.), ornament (for the head): yat te dṛṣṭā bhūṣaṇā uhyamānā, cūḍā vastrā mahya mañce 'dṛśāsi Lalitavistara 195.19 (verse). Prob. = the usual Sanskrit cūḍāmaṇi; Tibetan cod pan, diadem, tiara (usually = mukuṭa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cūḍā (चूडा).—f.

(-ḍā) 1. A single lock of hair left on the crown of the head at the ceremony of tonsure. 2. A peacock’s crest. 3. Any crest, plume, diadem, &c. 4. The head. 5. Top, summit. 6. An upper house, a room on the top of a house, &c. 7. A kind of bracelet. 8. A small well. 9. Tonsure; more commonly cūḍākaraṇaṃ. E. cul to elevate, aṅ and ṭāp affixes, la changed to ḍa, and the vowel lengthened. cūl aṅ cula-samucchraye aṅ ḍasya laḥ niḥ dīrghaḥ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cūḍa (चूड).—I. m. or n. The ceremony of cutting the hair. Ii. f. ḍā. 1. A single lock of hair left on the crown of the head at the ceremony of tonsure. 2. The hair. 3. The ceremony of cutting the hair.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cūḍa (चूड).—[masculine] knob or protuberance (on bricks); the tonsure of a child ([ritual or religion]). [feminine] cūḍā the tuft or hair on the crown of the head, top i.[grammar]; also = [masculine] ([ritual or religion]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cūḍa (चूड):—mfn. stupid (?), [Divyāvadāna xxxv, 99 f.]

2) m. (cf. kūṭa) a sort of protuberance on a sacrificial brick, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa viii and; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra] (also ifc. f(ā). )

3) m. or n. = ḍā-karaṇa, [Yājñavalkya iii, 23]

4) m. Name of a man (with the [patronymic] Bhāgavitti), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa xiv, 9, 3, 17 f.]

5) Cūḍā (चूडा):—[from cūḍa] a f. (beginning a Gaṇa of [Gaṇaratna-mahodadhi 365] : [gana] bhidādi) the hair on the top of the head, single lock or tuft left on the crown of the head after tonsure, [Raghuvaṃśa xviii, 50] (ifc.), [Parāśara-smṛti]

6) [v.s. ...] = ḍā-karaṇa (cf. ḍopanayana), [Raghuvaṃśa iii, 28; Smṛtitattva i]

7) [v.s. ...] the crest of a cock or peacock, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] any crest, plume, diadem, [Horace H. Wilson]

9) [v.s. ...] the head, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] the top (of a column), [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi i, 3]

11) [v.s. ...] the summit, [Hitopadeśa i, l 01]

12) [v.s. ...] a top-room (of a house), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] a kind of bracelet, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] a small well, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] Name of a metre

16) [v.s. ...] of a woman [gana] bāhvādi (ḍālā, [Kāśikā-vṛtti])

17) Cūḍa (चूड):—cf. cūla, coḍa, caula uc-, candra-, tāmra-, svarṇa-

18) Cūḍā (चूडा):—[v.s. ...] paṃcaand mahā-cūḍā.

19) [from cūḍa] b f. of ḍa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cūḍā (चूडा):—(ḍā) 1. f. Single lock left on the crown of the head; a crest; a top; head; upper room; bracelet.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Cūḍā (चूडा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Cūlā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Cuda in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Cūḍā (चूडा):—(nm) a lock of hair on on top of the head; a large-sized broad bangle; (a) the best, most eminent; ~[karma] the ceremony of tonsure; ~[maṇi] a jewel worn on top of the head; the best; most excellent (of).

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Cūḍa (ಚೂಡ):—

1) [noun] a bunch of hairs (on the head).

2) [noun] the natural tuft on the top of the head of a peacock or the comb of a rooster.

3) [noun] the top of anything; summit; ridge.

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Cūḍa (ಚೂಡ):—[noun] thick, matted hair.

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Cūḍā (ಚೂಡಾ):—[noun] flattened rice, made by soaking the paddy in water and pounding, spiced and seasoned.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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