Cotton; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Cotton means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Cotton refers to a textile that was actively produced and exported in ancient India.—By the time trade with the Roman Empire reached its peak, India was a major exporter of textiles (eg., Cotton), specially cotton and silk. The Vedas refer to various types of garments as well as fabrics such as wool (avi, śāmulya) or silk (tarpya), also to weaving and looms. Later on, cotton appears (karpāsa) and we get some information on weaving skills from Buddhist literature.

From the 5th century CE), hoards of fragments of cotton material from Gujarat were found in Egyptian tombs at Fustat. India exported cotton to China, silk to Indonesia and all the way to the Far East. Fabrics — especially cotton and silk — often provided supports for much painted, printed or embroidered artwork (see an example left, from Gujarat), whether the resulting piece was to be worn as a sari or brocade or hung as tapestry.

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Other Technologies: A Survey
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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