Corporeality; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Corporeality means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

produced through consciousness, karma, etc.; s. samutthāna. - Sensitive c.: pasāda-rūpa.

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Relevant definitions

Search found 72 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Sensitive Corporeality
pasāda-rūpa.
Corporeality Group
rūpa-kkhandha: s. khandha.
Corporeality Perceptions
rūpa-saññā: s. jhāna.
Derived Corporeality
upādā-rūpa; further s. khandha (I. B.).
Produced Corporeality
nipphanna-rūpa.
Corporeality And Mind
s. nāma-rūpa.
Mind And Corporeality
nāma-rūpa.
Karmically Acquired Corporeality
upādinnarūpa.
Karma Produced Corporeality
s. samutthāna.
Origination Of Corporeality
s. samutthāna.
Khandha
Khandha, (Sk. skandha) — I. Crude meaning: bulk, massiveness (gross) substance. A. esp. used (a...
Rupa
Rūpa (रूप) represents one of the four stages of creation corresponding to the Ājñā-cakra, and i...
Citta
Citta (चित्त, “mind”) or Cittavaśitā refers to the “mastery of mind” and represents one of the ...
Bhava
Bhava (भव) is the name of a deity who received the Sūkṣmāgama from Sūkṣma through the mahānsamb...
Jati
Jātī (जाती) refers to the lotus and represents flowers (puṣpa) once commonly used in ancient Ka...

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