Citrashikhandin, Citraśikhaṇḍin, Citra-shikhandin: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Citrashikhandin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Citraśikhaṇḍin can be transliterated into English as Citrasikhandin or Citrashikhandin, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Chitrashikhandin.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (C) next»] — Citrashikhandin in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्) is another name for Saptarṣi (the constellation Ursa Major).—cf. Citraśikhaṇḍinandana. [...] Bṛhaspati is so-called because he is the son of Aṅgiras who belongs to the group of Citraśikhaṇḍins, more commonly known as Saptarṣi or the constellation Ursa Major. References to the Citraśikhaṇḍin group are sometimes found in Kāvya poetry, e.g. in Maṅkhaka 16.25; in Yaśastilaka (chapter 1); in Bālarāmāyaṇa 10.35, 98; in Haravijaya 3.64.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[«previous (C) next»] — Citrashikhandin in Pancaratra glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Narayaniya Translation Introduction and Philosophical Commentary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्) referes to the seven sages (viz., Marīci, Atri, Aṅgiras, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, and Vasiṣṭha), according to the second chapter of the Nārāyaṇīya.—Accordingly, “[...] that which those sages celebrated as the seven Citraśikhaṇḍins, becoming of one mind enunciated, became the best Scripture. Marīci, Atri, Aṅgiras, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, and Vasiṣṭha of great brilliance are the Citraśikhaṇḍins. These indeed are the seven prakṛtis to whom that of the Self-Born One is the eighth. By these the world is sustained and to these the Scripture was transmitted. The disciplined sages, one pointed in mind, who were engaged in controlling [themselves] propounded the Scripture contemplating in their minds the worlds thinking, ‘This is the highest Good, this is Brahman, this is the insuperable Felicity’”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (C) next»] — Citrashikhandin in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्).—m. an epithet of the seven sages :--मरीचि, अङ्गिरस्, अत्रि, पुलस्त्य, पुलह, क्रतु (marīci, aṅgiras, atri, pulastya, pulaha, kratu) and वसिष्ठ (vasiṣṭha); मरीचिरत्र्यङ्गिरसौ पुलस्त्यः पुलहः क्रतुः । वसिष्ठश्च महातेजास्ते हि चित्रशिखण्डिनः (marīciratryaṅgirasau pulastyaḥ pulahaḥ kratuḥ | vasiṣṭhaśca mahātejāste hi citraśikhaṇḍinaḥ) || Mb.12.335.29. °जः (jaḥ) an epithet of Bṛhaspati.

Citraśikhaṇḍin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms citra and śikhaṇḍin (शिखण्डिन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्).—m. plu.

(-ṇḍinaḥ) The seven sages or Rishis, but especially as represented in the seven principal stars of the great bear; these sages are Marichi, Atri, Angiras, Pulaha, Pulastya, Kratu, and Vasisht'Ha. E. citra surprising, śikhaṇḍa a crest, and ini affix; sing. nom. case, śikhaṇḍin (-ṇḍī) citraḥ śikhaṇḍaḥ asni asya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्).—m. pl. the seven Ṛṣis, Mahābhārata 12, 12722.

Citraśikhaṇḍin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms citra and śikhaṇḍin (शिखण्डिन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्).—[masculine] [plural] [Epithet] of the seven Ṛṣis (lit. having bright crests), as a constellation the Great Bear.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citraśikhaṇḍin (चित्रशिखण्डिन्):—[=citra-śikhaṇḍin] [from citra > cit] m. [plural] ‘bright-crested’, the 7 Ṛṣis (Marici, Atri, Aṅgiras, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, Vasiṣṭha [Mahābhārata xii; Bālarāmāyaṇa x, 98]; Viśvā-mitra, i, 27), [Rājataraṅgiṇī i, 55]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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