Citrabhanu, Citrabhānu, Citra-bhanu: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Citrabhanu means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chitrabhanu.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—A warrior son of Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 90. 33.

1b) A name of the sun; moves in the north of Śākadvīpa in Śravaṇa and Uttarāṣāḍha;1 begged of Kārtavīryārjuna, the seven islands as bhikṣā and burnt them all; father of Varuṇa (Vasiṣṭha) famous as Āpava who cursed the king; the sun-god in the guise of a Brahmana asked for food all the immovable property of the king to which he agreed; Āditya was pleased with him and gave him resplendent and useful arrows; he ate all the eastern parts of the kingdom including the tapovana.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 73, 136; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 128.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 69. 38-47; Vāyu-purāṇa 94. 39; 95. 3-13.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) refers to the sixteenth of the sixty-year cycle of Jupiter, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 8), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The first year of the fourth yuga is known as Citrabhānu; in it mankind will be happy. The second is known as Subhānu. In it mankind will be neither happy nor miserable; there will however be disease in the land but no deaths in consequence. The next year is known as Tāraṇa; in it there will be abundance of rain. The next is known as Pārthiva; in it crops with thrive well and mankind will be happy. The fifth year is known as Vyaya; in it amorous sensastions will prevail over the land”.

Source: The effect of Samvatsaras: Satvargas

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) refers to the sixteenth saṃvatsara (“jovian year)” in Vedic astrology.—The native born in the ‘samvatsara’ of ‘citrabhanu’ is fond of (wearing) various kinds of clothes and flowers, has a heart or mind which is full of different ambitions, is good natured and is endowed with crafts or arts.

According with Jataka Parijata, the person born in the year citrabhanu (2002-2003 AD) will have the energy and the beauty of the lord of the day.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Arcana-dipika - 3rd Edition

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) is the sixteenth of sixty years (saṃvatsara) in the Vedic lunar calendar according to the Arcana-dīpikā by Vāmana Mahārāja (cf. Appendix).—Accordingl, There are sixty different names for each year in the Vedic lunar calendar, which begins on the new moon day (Amāvasyā) after the appearance day of Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu (Gaura-pūrṇimā), in February or March. The Vedic year [viz., Citrabhānu], therefore, does not correspond exactly with the Christian solar calendar year.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) refers to the “beautiful sun (of energy)”, according to the Devīpañcaśataka, an important source of the Kālīkrama that developed in Kashmir after the Kālī Mata of the Jayadrathayāmala.—Accordingly, “The permutation (of the Transmental) is said to be the Light that precedes the mistress of the Wheel of Rays [i.e., puñjacakra-īśī] (of divine consciousness). [...] (That light) is not the moon, (or) the light of the stars; it is not the light of the rays of (the sun), the lord of the sky, nor is it the brilliance of lightning—nor is it like the beautiful sun (of energy) [i.e., citrabhānu]. That Light (bhāsā) is seen in the belly (of consciousness) with the eye of knowledge, that is, in the eye on the path of opening (unmeṣa). She is not seen otherwise. All (things) shine due to her: Fire, Moon, Sun and stars. As the division of Sun and Moon, she bestows the plane of oneness. Thus she is the aggregate (kula) of rays and, ferocious, she is the Supreme One (Parā) who has reached the final end of Kula and devours duality with the Yoga of the Fire of (Universal) Destruction.”.—(Cf. Puñjacakra).

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Citrabhānu is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—a. of a variegated colour, shining with light; चित्रभानुरुषसां भात्यग्रे (citrabhānuruṣasāṃ bhātyagre) R.7.9.3; प्रपूर्वगौ पूर्वजौ चित्रभानू (prapūrvagau pūrvajau citrabhānū) Mb.1.3.57. (-nuḥ) 1 fire; पुच्छैः शिरोभिश्च भृशं चित्रभानुं प्रपेदिरे (pucchaiḥ śirobhiśca bhṛśaṃ citrabhānuṃ prapedire) Mb.1.53. 5.

2) the sun; (citrabhānurvibhātīti dine ravau rātrau vahnau K. P. 2 given as an instance of one of the modes of añjana).

3) Name of Bhairava.

4) the Arka plant.

5) Śiva.

6) an epithet of the Aśvins.

7) the first year of the first cycle of Jupiter.

Citrabhānu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms citra and bhānu (भानु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—name of a former Buddha: Mahāvastu i.139.4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—m.

(-nuḥ) 1. Fire. 2. The sun. 3. A name of Bhairava, a form of Siva. 4. The marking-nut plant. 5. Gigantic swallow wort. E. citra surprising, and bhānu light. citrāḥ bhānavaḥ yasya .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—I. adj. resplendent, Chr. 290, 7 = [Rigveda.] i. 64, 7. Ii. m. fire, Mahābhārata 1, 2036. Vṛhad-bhānu, i. e.

Citrabhānu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms citra and bhānu (भानु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु).—[adjective] shining bright; [masculine] fire.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—son of Arthapati, grandson of Kubera, father of Bāṇa. Oxf. 156^b.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु):—[=citra-bhānu] [from citra > cit] mfn. (tra-) of variegated lustre, shining with light, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda iv, 25, 3; xiii, 3, 10; Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa ii f.; Kauśika-sūtra; Mahābhārata i, 722]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of fire, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa; Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] = trārcis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Plumbago zeylanica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Calotropis gigantea, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] the 16th year in the 60 years' cycle of Jupiter, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā viii, 35; Romakasiddhānta]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of Bhairava, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] of a prince, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa iv, 16, 2] ([varia lectio])

9) [v.s. ...] of Bāṇa (-bhaṭṭa) ’s father.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Citrabhānu (चित्रभानु):—[citra-bhānu] (nuḥ) 2. m. Fire; sun; Shiva; the marking-nut plant; gigantic swallowwort.

[Sanskrit to German]

Citrabhanu in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Citrabhanu in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Citrabhānu (ಚಿತ್ರಭಾನು):—

1) [noun] the sun, the bright-shining one.

2) [noun] fire or the Fire-God.

3) [noun] name of the sixteenth year in the Hindu cycle of sixty years.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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