Cauranginatha, Cauraṅginātha, Caurangi-natha: 1 definition

Introduction

Cauranginatha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chauranginatha.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[«previous (C) next»] — Cauranginatha in Shilpashastra glossary
Source: DSpace at Pondicherry: Siddha Cult in Tamilnadu (sculpture)

Cauraṅginātha (चौरङ्गिनाथ) refers to the third representation of the nine navanātha reliefs in the Ulsūr Someśvara temple.—Next after Nāganātha is Cauraṅginātha seated comfortably, by hanging his legs freely on the caparisoned deer as if riding it by holding the bridle/reins in his left hand which is tied to its mouth. A wallet is tied to his left arm, and bangle like rings are found on his both wrists and arms, big kuṇḍalas on his ears, and necklace like ornament are clearly visible. His hair is piled in a knot on the top of his head. Interestingly, he is depicted as holding the deer horn in his right hand as he is producing the Siṅganātha (‘a roar of a lion’).

In the Ulsūr Someśvara temple, on the south wall of the ardhamaṇḍapa, there found depictions of the navanāthas (eg. Cauraṅginātha) in a variety of poses with huge coffiures, holding attributes such as kamaṇḍala, daṇḍa (staff) and so on. From east to west the nine sculptures of the Nāthas appear in the following order: seated respectively on a Tortoise, Vyāli, Lion, Fish, Scorpion, Snake, Antelope, Boar and Tiger.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of cauranginatha in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

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