Catushtaya, Catuṣṭaya, Cātuṣṭaya: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Catushtaya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Catuṣṭaya and Cātuṣṭaya can be transliterated into English as Catustaya or Catushtaya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Chatushtaya.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) or Catuṣṭayarasa is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 3, Kāsaroga: cough-related-diseases). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., catuṣṭaya-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Catushtaya in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) refers to the tetrad of 1) initiation (dīkṣā), 2) knowledge (jñāna), 3) yoga and 4) caryā, according to the Guhyasūtra, the largest book of the Niśvāsa-corpus (a collection of early Śaiva Tantras comprising the Niśvāsamukha, Mūlasūtra, Uttarasūtra, Nayasūtra, and Guhyasūtra).—Accordingly, “[...] (110) Knowing this, one should not give [lightly] the supreme nectar of Lord Śiva. (111) According to this scripture of the Lord, one may attain Śiva by each of the following [practised individually]: initiation, knowledge, yoga and caryā in due order. [...] (114) This tetrad (catuṣṭaya) has been taught to destroy the dangers of saṃsāra. It should not [lightly] be given to others if one desires supernatural power for oneself”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) [=Catur?] refers to “four (elements)”, according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñāvivṛtivimarśinī 2.131:—“[...] For the former [i.e., Ṣaḍdhātusamīkṣā] acknowledge that ordinary human practice is accounted for if this much [is admitted]: the five elements and consciousness, because such other [things as] the sense organs are included in these; whereas the latter admit that the ordinary human practice [consisting in the relationship between] an apprehending [subject] and an apprehended [object] is accounted for if a particular transformation called ‘consciousness’ arises in the four elements (bhūta-catuṣṭaya) from [some of their] various combinations, and if this transformation does not arise [from other combinations of the four elements]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Catushtaya in Shaktism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) [=Catur?] refers to “four (hands)”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I honour Padmā, [beautiful and tender like] a lotus plant. Her eyes are lotus-like and she dwells in a bed of lotuses. Her four arms (pāṇi-catuṣṭaya) look splendid with two lotuses [in two hands] and the gestures of grace and safety [in two others]. May the virgin goddess Durgā annihilate my hardships, I pray. Her hands are marked by the conch and discus. She has curly locks and rides [a lion,] the king of wild animals. [...]

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) refers to the “four positions” (i.e., Gṛhakṣata, Yama, Gandharva and Bhṛṅga), according to the Mayasaṃgraha (verse 5.156-187).—Accordingly, [while describing the pura on a 9-by-9-plan and the 32 padas]—“At Gṛhakṣata one should set up [a storeroom for] bows, arrows, swords, and other weapons. At Yama there should be a place for ascetics to achieve contemplation of the self. Singers are stationed at Gandharva. At Bhṛṅga is a hall for the exposition [of the śāstras]. Or one may construct a large maṭha on the four [positions] (catuṣṭaya) which are Gṛhakṣata and [Yama, Gandharva and Bhṛṅga]”.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Catushtaya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय).—a.

1) (- f.) [चत्वारोऽवयवा विधा अस्य तयप् (catvāro'vayavā vidhā asya tayap)] Four-fold, consisting of four; पुराणस्य कवेस्तस्य चतुर्मुख- समीरिता । प्रवृत्तिरासीच्छब्दानां चरितार्था चतुष्टयी (purāṇasya kavestasya caturmukha- samīritā | pravṛttirāsīcchabdānāṃ caritārthā catuṣṭayī) || Kumārasambhava 2.17.

-yam A group or collection of four; एकैकमप्यनर्थाय किमु यत्र चतुष्टयम् (ekaikamapyanarthāya kimu yatra catuṣṭayam) H. Pr.11; Kumārasambhava 7.62; मासचतुष्टयस्य भोजनम् (māsacatuṣṭayasya bhojanam) H.1.

2) A square.

3) The first, fourth, seventh, and tenth signs of the zodiac.

4) The centre of a circle.

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Cātuṣṭaya (चातुष्टय).—a. [cātuṣṭayaṃ vetti, aṇ] Knowing or familiar with the चतुष्टय (catuṣṭaya).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय).—mfn.

(-yaḥ-yī-yaṃ) 1. Four. 2. Four-fold. n.

(-yaṃ) 1. A square. 2. The centre of a circle. 3. The aggregate of four. E. catur, and tayap aff. catvāro'vayavā vidhā asya tayapr .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय).—i. e. catur + taya, I. adj., f. . 1. Of four different sorts, Mahābhārata 12, 11965. 2. Being four, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 3, 15, 28. Ii. n. A collection of four things, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 180.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय).—[feminine] ī fourfold, consisting of four; [neuter] the number four or a collection of four.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय):—[from catasṛ] mf(ī)n. ([nominative case] [plural] ye, [Pāṇini 8-3, 101; Kāśikā-vṛtti]) fourfold, consisting of 4 [Atharva-veda x, 2, 3; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa xiii; Aitareya-brāhmaṇa iii, viii; Śāṅkhāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.; 4 [Bhāgavata-purāṇa iii, 15, 28]

2) [v.s. ...] n. a set of 4, quaternion, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra viii; Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Manu-smṛti] etc. (ifc. f(ā). , [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi])

3) [v.s. ...] n. a square, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] the 1st, 4th, 7th, and 10th signs of the zodiac, [Varāha-mihira’s Yogayātrā iv, 48]

5) [v.s. ...] ‘a collection of Sūtras consisting of 4 sections’ See cāt.

6) Cātuṣṭaya (चातुष्टय):—[from cātura] mfn. ([from] cat) versed in the Sūtras consisting of 4 sections, [Pāṇini 4-2, 65; Kāśikā-vṛtti]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय):—[catu-ṣṭaya] (yaḥ-yī-yaṃ) a. Four-fold; a square; centre of a circle.

[Sanskrit to German]

Catushtaya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Catushtaya in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Catuṣṭaya (चतुष्टय) [Also spelled chatushtay]:—(nm) an aggregate of four (things, persons, etc.).

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Catushtaya in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Catuṣṭaya (ಚತುಷ್ಟಯ):—

1) [adjective] consisting, made of four components; having or including four things, persons, etc.

2) [adjective] having four times as much or as many; four-fold.

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Catuṣṭaya (ಚತುಷ್ಟಯ):—[noun] a group of four persons, animals, things, etc.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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