Caturbhadra, Cāturbhadra, Catur-bhadra: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Caturbhadra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chaturbhadra.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous (C) next»] — Caturbhadra in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Ancient Science of Life: Yogaśataka of Pandita Vararuci

Cāturbhadra (चातुर्भद्र) refers to a decoction available in Śārṅgadhara-saṃhitā.—Decoction of śuṇṭhi, mustā, ativiṣā and guḍūcī is indicated for mandāgni (low digestive power), āmavāta, grahaṇī (sprue) and diseases caused by āma. It is also known as cāturbhadra decoction in Śārṅgadhara-saṃhitā. The famous phalatrikādi decoction which is available in Caraka-saṃhitā is also described using the same words.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous (C) next»] — Caturbhadra in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

cāturbhadra (चातुर्भद्र).—n S The aggregate of four medicinal things esteemed as excellent; viz. ativiśa, suṇṭha, nāgaramōthā, guḷavēla.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (C) next»] — Caturbhadra in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Caturbhadra (चतुर्भद्र).—the aggregate of the four ends of human life (puruṣārtha); i. e. धर्म, अर्थ, काम (dharma, artha, kāma) and मोक्ष (mokṣa).

Derivable forms: caturbhadram (चतुर्भद्रम्).

Caturbhadra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms catur and bhadra (भद्र).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Caturbhadra (चतुर्भद्र).—n.

(-draṃ) The aggregate of four objects of human wishes, viz. virtue, love, wealth, and final beatitude. E. catur four, and bhadra fortunate, auspicious: see caturvarga.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Caturbhadra (चतुर्भद्र).—n. sing. four good things, [Hitopadeśa] i. [distich] 158, M. M.

Caturbhadra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms catur and bhadra (भद्र).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Caturbhadra (चतुर्भद्र):—[=catur-bhadra] [from catur > catasṛ] mfn. (4 times id est.) extremely auspicious, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

2) [v.s. ...] n. 4 objects of human wishes (viz. dharma, kāma, artha, bala, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; or the first 3 with mokṣa, [Horace H. Wilson]; or kīrti, āyus, yaśas, bala, [Mahābhārata xiii, 5657]; or dharma, jñāna, vairāgya, aiśvarya, [vii, 2182 [Scholiast or Commentator]]; or dāna, jñāna, śaurya, bhoga or vitta, [ib.; Hitopadeśa i, 6, 58])

3) Cāturbhadra (चातुर्भद्र):—[from cātura] n. ([from] cat) a collection of 4 medicinal plants, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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