Candrika, Candrikā, Candrīkā: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Candrika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandrika.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका, “shining particles”) is a Sanskrit technical term used throughout Rasaśāstra literature, such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara.

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Candrika in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (e.g., Candrikā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका).—A kala of the moon.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 35. 32.

2a) Candrīkā (चन्द्रीका).—A mother goddess; enshrined at Hariścandra.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 13. 40; 179. 28.

2b) A R. sacred to Pitrs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 22. 63.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is the name of various commentaries on the Vṛttaratnākara of Kedārabhaṭṭa (C. 950-1050 C.E.), who was a celebrated author in Sanskrit prosody The various authors that produced a work named Candrikā are as follows: 1) Prabhāvallabha, 2) Rudra. The Vṛttaratnākara is considered as most popular work in Sanskrit prosody, because of its rich and number of commentaries.

2) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (e.g., Candrikā) in 20 verses.

Source: Journal of the University of Bombay Volume V: Apabhramsa metres (2)

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is the name of a catuṣpadi metre (as popularly employed by the Apabhraṃśa bards), as discussed in books such as the Chandonuśāsana, Kavidarpaṇa, Vṛttajātisamuccaya and Svayambhūchandas.—Candrikā has 16 mātrās in each of its four lines, divided into the groups of 5, 5, 4, [S] mātrās.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (e.g., Candrikā) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is another name for Karṇasphoṭā, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Cardiospermum halicacabum (balloon plant) from the Sapindaceae or “soapberry” family of flowering plants, according to verse 3.137-138 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh).  Karṇasphoṭā is not mentioned by Dhanvantari (in his Nighaṇṭu); however Chopra identifies it as Cardiospermum halicacabum Linn.; yet, the properties mentioned by chopra do not tally with the text. Together with the names Candrikā and Karṇasphoṭā, there are a total of eight Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is also mentioned as a synonym for Śvetakaṇṭakārī, a medicinal plant related to Kaṇṭakārī, according to verse 4.33-36. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Candrikā and Śvetakaṇṭakārī, there are a total of twenty-four Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Candrika in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) refers to (1) “moonlight”, (2) “baldness”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 12.102. With regard to the latter meaning, Malli explains the word [candrikā] as śirorogaviśeṣa [...].

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) is the name of a work ascribed to Rāmapāṇivāda (18th Century): a scholar of multi discipline, who flourished in Kerala in the 18th Century. He was a prolific writer both in Sanskrit and Prakrit. Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XXIV. pp. 173-74.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

candrikā (चंद्रिका).—f (S) Moonlight. 2 Esp. amongst dyers. Polish or gloss as arising to a color.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

candrikā (चंद्रिका).—f Moonlight.

--- OR ---

cāndrika (चांद्रिक).—

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका).—

1) Moonlight, इतः स्तुतिः का खलु चन्द्रिकाया यदब्धिमप्युत्तरलीकरोति (itaḥ stutiḥ kā khalu candrikāyā yadabdhimapyuttaralīkaroti) N.3.3.116; R.19.39; कामुकैः कुम्भीलकैश्च परिहर्तव्या चन्द्रिका (kāmukaiḥ kumbhīlakaiśca parihartavyā candrikā) M.4.

2) (At the end of comp.) Elucidation, throwing light on the subject treated; अलङ्कारचन्द्रिका, काव्यचन्द्रिका (alaṅkāracandrikā, kāvyacandrikā); cf. कौमुदी (kaumudī).

3) Illumination.

4) A large cardamom.

5) The river Chandrabhāgā.

6) The Mallikā creeper.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका).—f.

(-kā) 1. Moonlight. 2. A small fish, commonly Chanda, (Chanda of var. species, Ham.) 3. Large cardamoms. E. candra the moon, candro’sti asyāḥ āśrayatvena ṭhan . cadi dīptau rak tataḥ svārthe kavā .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candrikā (चन्द्रिका).—see candraka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[dharma] Oppert. 7755. See Ācāracandrikā, Smṛticandrikā. Quoted by Mādhavācārya Oxf. 270^a, in Saṃskārakaustubha, Smṛtyarthasāgara, by Raghunandana and Kamalākara, and others.

2) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—vedānta, See Tātparyacandrikā.

3) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—Kāvyādarśaṭīkā by Bhīma. Hall. p. 63.

4) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—Paribhāṣārthasaṃgrahaṭīkā [grammatical] by Svayamprakāśānanda. Bik. 269.

5) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—Prabodhacandrodayaṭīkā, composed by the minister of a king called Nādillayappa. Bp. 55.

6) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—[grammatical] Pheh. 7.
—by Kṛṣṇācārya. Oppert. 2601. Ii, 5935. See Padacandrikā.
—by Rāmāśrama. K. 80. See Siddhāntacandrikā.
—by Śrīkāntamiśra. K. 80.
—bṛhatī, by Somanātha. K. 80.

7) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—(Mādhva doctrin) by Vyāsarāya i. e. Vyāsatīrtha. Hz. 1533 (inc). This is probably a
—[sub-commentary] to Ānandatīrtha’s Brahmasūtrabhāṣya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Candrikā (चन्द्रिका):—[from candraka > cand] a f. moonlight, [Meghadūta; Raghuvaṃśa; Bhartṛhari] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] ifc. splendour, [Vikramāṅkadeva-carita, by Bilhaṇa v, 37]

3) [v.s. ...] ifc. illumination, elucidation (of a work or subject, e. [gana] alaṃkāra-, kātantra-, etc.)

4) [v.s. ...] Name of a [commentator or commentary] on [Kāvyādarśa]

5) [v.s. ...] ‘moonshine’, baldness, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

6) [v.s. ...] the Chanda fish, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] cardamoms, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] = candraśūra, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

9) [v.s. ...] Gynandropsis pentaphylla, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] Jasminum Zambac, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Trigonella foenum graecum

12) [v.s. ...] a kind of white-blossoming Kaṇṭakārī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] the Utpalinī metre

14) [v.s. ...] (in music) a kind of measure

15) [v.s. ...] Name of Dākṣāyaṇī, [Matsya-purāṇa xiii]

16) [v.s. ...] of a woman, [Mālavikāgnimitra iv, 6/7]

17) [v.s. ...] of a Surāṅganā, [Siṃhāsana-dvātriṃśikā or vikramāditya-caritra, jaina recension]

18) [v.s. ...] of the Candra-bhāgā river, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

19) [from cand] b f. of draka q.v.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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