Candrashri, aka: Candraśrī, Candra-shri; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Candrashri means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Candraśrī can be transliterated into English as Candrasri or Candrashri, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandrashri.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Candrashri in Purana glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśrī (चन्द्रश्री).—A woman, who, though actually in love with her husband enjoyed life with her paramour. Candraśrī is the heroine of a story narrated in the Kathāsaritsāgara to prove that the interest married women take in clandestine relationship is only due to fleeting temptations. Candraśrī was the wife of a vaiśya called Bālavarman, who lived in the city of Pratiṣṭhāna. One day, looking out through the windows in her house she saw the very handsome vaiśya youth called Śīlahāra and felt great desire for him. She brought him secretly to the house of her companion and satisfied her desire. When their meeting became a routine affair her relations and servants knew about it. And, her husband alone was unaware of it. Once he became ill with severe fever. Even while he was in his death-bed Candraśrī continued her affair with the paramour. When one day she was with her paramour thus, she was told that her husband was no more. At once she took leave of him, returned home and committed suicide by jumping into the funeral pyre of the husband. (Kathāsaritsāgara, Śaktiyaśolambaka, Taraṅga 2).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Candraśrī (चन्द्रश्री).—The son of Dviyajña and father of Puloma.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 24. 48-9.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Candrashri in Katha glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśrī (चन्द्रश्री) is the wife of Balavarman, a merchant (vaṇij) from Kauśāmbī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 58. Accordingly, “... there was a merchant in this very city [Kauśāmbī] named Balavarman, and he had a wife named Candraśrī, and she beheld from a window a merchant’s handsome son, of the name of Śīlahara”.

The story of Candraśrī was narrated by Tapantaka to Naravāhanadatta in order to instruct him that he should “never repose any confidence at all in women, for they are all light, even those that, being married or unmarried, dwell in their father’s house, as well as those that are courtesans by profession”. Also that “the way of a woman’s heart truly hard to understand; they fall in love with strange men, and die when separated from their husbands”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Candraśrī, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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India history and geogprahy

Candra Śrī (r. 201-207 CE) or Candra Śrī Śātakarṇi is a king from the Sātavāhana dynasty of ancient India. The Sātavāhana lineage (known as Andhra in the Purāṇas) once ruled much of the Deccan region and several of the Ajantā caves at West-Khandesh (West-Khaṇḍeśa, modern Jalgaon) were carved in the 3rd century BCE when the region was ruled by kings (eg., Chandra or Candra Śrī Śātakarṇi) and descendants of the Sātavāhana kings. Candra Śrī Śātakarṇi was preceded by Vijaya Śātakarṇi and succeeded by Pulumāvi IV.

Source: Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Candrashri in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśrī (चन्द्रश्री).—n. of a Bodhisattva: Gv 4.3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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