Candrashala, Candraśālā, Candra-shala: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Candrashala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Candraśālā can be transliterated into English as Candrasala or Candrashala, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandrashala.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Candrashala in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला) refers to a “chamber on the top of a building”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 16.127. Cf; Haravijaya 21.1.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला) or Kāvya is the name of a work ascribed to Bhāskararāya (C. 1685-1775 C.E.), a polymath of who composed around forty works covering the subjects of vedānta, mīmāṃsā, vyākaraṇa, nyāya, prosody, kāvya, smṛti, mantraśāstra, Vedic literature. Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XVII. pp. 133-135.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Candrashala in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला).—

1) a room on the top (of a house &c.); चन्द्रशाला शिरोगृहम् (candraśālā śirogṛham) Amar.; वियद्गतः पुष्पकचन्द्रशालाः क्षणं प्रतिश्रुन्मुखराः करोति (viyadgataḥ puṣpakacandraśālāḥ kṣaṇaṃ pratiśrunmukharāḥ karoti) R.13.4.

2) moonlight.

Candraśālā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms candra and śālā (शाला).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला).—f.

(-lā) 1. Moonlight. 2. An upper room, an apartment on the top of the house. E. candra the moon, and śālā a hall. candraḥ śālā iva ādhāro yasyāḥ . jyotsnāyām, prāsādoparisthe gṛhe (cilera ghara) .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candraśāla (चन्द्रशाल).—f. an apartment on the house-top, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 13, 40.

Candraśāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms candra and śāla (शाल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला).—[feminine] moon chamber (on the top of the house).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला):—[=candra-śālā] [from candra > cand] f. = -prāsāda, [Raghuvaṃśa; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā lvi] (ifc. f(ā). ), moon-light, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Candraśālā (चन्द्रशाला):—f.

1) ein Zimmer auf dem Dache eines Hauses. Am Ende eines adj. Comp. f. ā. —

2) *Mondschein.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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