Candraprabha, aka: Candra-prabha, Candraprabhā; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Candraprabha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandraprabha.

In Hinduism

Purana

Candraprabha in Purana glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) is the name of a beautiful damsel (kanyā), with black curly hair and red lips, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 92. Candraprabhā (and other innumerable ladies) arose out of the agitation of Vaiṣṇavī while she was doing penance at Viśālā. For these young women, Vaiṣṇavī created the city Devīpura, containing numerous mansions with golden balconies, crystal stairs and water fountains, with jewelled windows and gardens.

Vaiṣṇavī is the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ).—(See Sūryaprabhā).

2) Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा).—Mother of the wonderful girl, Somaprabhā. (See Somaprabhā).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ).—A son of Maṇibhadra.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 155.

1b) Mountain north-west of Kailāsa; here are lake Svacchoda, river Svacchoda, forest Caitraratham, residence of Maṇibhadra, commander-in-chief of the Yakṣas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 18. 5-8; Matsya-purāṇa 121. 6; Vāyu-purāṇa 47. 5.

1c) A lake on the slopes of Meru Mt.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 18. 68; Vāyu-purāṇa 47. 65.

1d) The name of Ila's horse which became a mare in the Śaravana forest.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 12. 3.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Candraprabha in Katha glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

1) Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) is the wife of Dharmagupta: a richt merchant from the city Pāṭaliputra, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 17. She gave birth to an apsaras (heavenly nymph) named Somaprabhā. Their story was told by Vasantaka to Padmāvatī and queen Vāsavadattā.

2) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ) is the name of a prince (son of king Ādityaprabha) who was accidentally slain and cooked by Sāhasika, instead of Phalabhūti, for the purpose of a magic rite, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 20. Phalabhūti is the supposed name of Somadatta (one of the two sons of Agnidatta). Their story was told by Yaugandharāyaṇa to king Udayana in order to demonstrate that a sensible man will not injure one who treats him well, for whoever does, will find that it turns out unfortunately for himself.

3) Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) is the name of a Vidyādharī and eldest of the four daughters of king Śaśikhaṇḍa, according to the “story of the golden city”, in the to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 26. Accordingly, Candraprabhā said to Śaktideva: “... there is in this land a king of the Vidyādharas named Śaśikhaṇḍa, and we four daughters were born to him in due course; I am the eldest, Candraprabhā, and the next is Chandrarekhā, and the third is Śaśirekhā, and the fourth Śaśiprabhā. We gradually grew up to womanhood in our father’s house, and once upon a time those three sisters of mine went together to the shore of the Ganges to bathe, while I was detained at home by illness; then they began to play in the water, and in the insolence of youth they sprinkled with water a hermit named Agryatapas while he was in the stream”.

4) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ), son of Aṅgāraprabha, is the name of an ancient king of Śākala, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 44. Accordingly, as Vajraprabha said to Naravāhanadatta: “of old there was in the country of the people of Madra a town named Śākala; Candraprabha, the son of Aṅgāraprabha, was king of it. By his wife, named Kīrtimatī, there was born to that king a son, whose future glory was indicated by his exceedingly auspicious marks”.

5) Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) is the name of a princess from Mahadha, as mentioned in the third story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 77. Accordingly, “... and the prince [Vikramakeśarin] married as a wife, by the advice of the parrot, a princess of equal birth, of the royal family of Magadha, named Candraprabhā. That princess also possessed a similar hen-maina, of the name of Somikā, remarkable for knowledge and discernment”.

6) Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) is the wife of king Yaśaḥketu from Śivapura, as mentioned in the fifteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 89. Accordingly, “... [king Yaśaḥketu] devolved upon his minister, named Prajñāsāgara, the burden of his kingdom, and enjoyed himself in the society of his queen, Candraprabhā. And in course of time that king had born to him, by that queen, a daughter named Śaśiprabhā, bright as the moon, the eye of the world”.

7) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ) is the name of an ancient king from Ujjayinī according to the eighteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 92. Accordingly, “... in that city [Ujjayinī] there was a learned Brāhman, named Devasvāmin, who had offered many sacrifices, and possessed great wealth, and who was highly honoured by the king, whose name was Candraprabha”.

8) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ) is the son of king Sūryaprabha from Vakraloka, although he was conceived by Manaḥsvāmin and Dhanavatī, according to the nineteenth story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 93. Accordingly, “... and King Sūryaprabha spent twelve days in music, and dancing, and other amusements, and then he gave that son the name of Candraprabha. And gradually Prince Candraprabha increased in stature as well as in excellent character, delighting his dependents by both. And in course of time he grew up, and became capable of bearing the weight of the earth, winning over the subjects by his courage, his generosity, his learning and other accomplishments”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Candraprabhā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ) is one of the sixteen bodhisattvas appearing in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī v5.38-41. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī (literally, ‘an explanation of the nāma-mantras’) is a commentary (ṭīkā) on the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti.

Candraprabha is a name of Mañjuśrī (the embodiement of non-dual knowledge) and, together with other names, forms the core essence of the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī provides the practitioner a sādhana (‘meditative practice’) to turn these names into mantras. These mantras are chanted for the benefit of all beings, and then placed and contemplated in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, which is an extended version of the Vajradhātu-maṇḍala.

The Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti (lit. ‘chanting of the names of Mañjuśrī’) is a short but influential Buddhist tantra, containing the essence of the teachings of Śākyamuni (the historical Buddha). It was composed by Vilāsavajra in the 8th century and contains 3000 verses in the anuṣṭubh meter.

Source: Wisdom Library: Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Candraprabha in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

1) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ).—According to appendix 6 at Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter IV.—King Candraprabha of Bhadraśilā (according to other sources, King Mahāprahāsa of Vāraṇasī) is renowned for his generosity. The Brahmin Raudrākṣa comes to ask him for his head. The ministers Mahācandra and Mahīdhara offer him a head made of precious substances; the Brahmin does not accept; the king attaches his hair to a tree and cuts his head off himself to give it to the Brahmin.

2) Candraprabha (चन्द्रप्रभ) is the name of a prince (kumāra) who offered his blood (śoṇita) and marrow (majja) to a blind man according to a note from the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XX). Accordingly, “Again, prince (kumāra) Yue kouang (Candraprabha) went out for a ride one day. A leper (pāmavat) saw him, stopped his chariot and said to him: ‘I am gravely sick (glāna), tired (ārta) and in pain. Will the prince, who rides for pleasure, be the only one to enjoy himself? I would like him, with a mind of great compassion (mahākaruṇācitta), to cure me’”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

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Candraprabha (सुपार्श्व):—The eighth Tīrthaṅkara (Janism recognizes 24 such teachers or Siddhas). He is also known as Candraprabhanātha. His colour is white (śveta), according to Aparājitapṛcchā (221.5-7). His height is 150dhanuṣa (a single dhanuṣa (or, ‘bow’) equals 6 ft), thus, roughly corresponding to 274 meters. His emblem, or symbol, is a Crescent Moon.

Candraprabha’s father is Mahāsena and his mother is Lakṣmaṇā according to Śvetāmbara but Lakṣmī according to Digambara . It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा) refers to “moonstar”, and is the name of a type of precious stone (gem or jewel) typically used in ancient India. It is also known by the name Candrakānta. Both the king (rājan) and the people used to keep previous stones as a part of their wealth and affluence. The king’s mansion was studded with precious stones of various kinds. The rich people possessed them in large quantity and used them in ornaments and for other purposes. The courtesans (gaṇiya) possessed costly jewels and their chambers were adorned with precious jewels. The palanquins of the kings, nobles and rich persons (śreṣṭhins) were inlaid with costly gems.

There were persons expert in the field of gem and jewels (eg., candraprabhā) called maṇikāras (jewellers). There is a reference of maṇikāra-śreṣṭhin in Rājagṛha who had abundant gems and jewels. Various ornaments of pearls and jewels are mentioned in the texts viz. Kaṇagāvali (necklace of gold and gems), rayaṇāvali (necklace of jewels), muttāvali (necklace of pearls), etc. The above description of the various agricultural, agro-based, mining or forestry occupations clearly depicts the high level of perfection achieved in the respective fields.

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Candraprabha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraprabhā (चन्द्रप्रभा).—moon-light.

Candraprabhā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms candra and prabhā (प्रभा).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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