Candragupta: 10 definitions

Introduction

Candragupta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandragupta.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

[«previous (C) next»] — Candragupta in Vaishnavism glossary
Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त).—A king of the Maurya dynasty in India. His armies repelled Alexander the Great’s advance into India.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (C) next»] — Candragupta in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त).—Second son of Rāvaṇa. Once when Śrī Rāma was King, Candragupta abducted the daughter o! Sugrīva and the daughter-in-law of Vibhīṣaṇa. Hanumān released them both as ordered by Śrī Rāma. (Kampa Rāmāyaṇa Uttara Kāṇḍa; also see Sahasramukha Rāvaṇa).

2) Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त).—A minister of Kārtavīryārjuna. Kārtavīryārjuna was once fed sumptuously by Jamadagni at his āśrama with the help of Śuśīlā, the devasurabhi (divine cow). Candragupta, at the instance of Kārtavīryārjuna tried to capture Suśīlā by force, which disappeared immediately in the sky. Kārtavīryārjuna’s servants then forcibly took away its calf. Candragupta thrashed to death Jamadagni, who tried to obstruct their action. (See Kārtavīrya, Para 9).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त).—Anointed first king of the Mauryas by the Brāhmaṇa Kauṭalya who brought about the fall of Nandas; ruled for 24 years.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 1. 13; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 144; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 331; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 24. 28.

1b) The unrighteous minister of Haihaya who advised the king to get by peace or force the cow of Jamadagni so that he could ever have plenty. The king agreed and sent him to fetch the cow. Jamadagni argued that it was intended for religious purposes. The minister, without listening to those words had the animal bound. Jamadagni tied himself to the cow, and being beaten fell down dead. The cow kicked off her fetters and flew into heaven. The minister reported the matter to the king who returned to his city greatly dejected.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 28. 31-7; 29. 8 ff.

1c) A commander to aid Viṣaṅga; was killed by Duhśilā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 24. 29.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (C) next»] — Candragupta in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

1) Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त) is the name of a son of King Nanda, whose story is told in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 5.

2) Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त) is the name of a Vidyādhara who fought on Śrutaśarman’s side in the war against Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 48. Accordingly: “... then Śrutaśarman, beside himself with grief, anger and shame, sent two more Vidyādharas, captains of hosts of warriors and distinguished warriors: one was called Candragupta, born in the house of the lord of the great mountain Candrakula, beautiful as a second moon”.

The story of Candragupta was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Candragupta, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त) is the name of an important person (viz., an Ācārya or Kavi) mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—In Indian history, a number of kings with same name these are particularly refer to Samudragupta’s son and Skandagupta’s father, the famous Candragupta II. As in the Kāvyamīmāṃsā says about this name for purpose of examination of poet, so he may be one of the poets. However in this time we cannot found anyone poet who have been flourished in this name.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

[«previous (C) next»] — Candragupta in Buddhism glossary
Source: academia.edu: The Chronological History of Buddhism

Candragupta I established the rule of Gupta dynasty in Magadha around 335 BCE. The Guptas were Parama-bhagavatas or the followers of Vaishnavism. They neither promoted nor suppressed Buddhism. Actually, the debates between Buddhist scholars and Vedic philosophers became rare due to lack of royal patronage.

India history and geogprahy

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त) is an example of a Śaivite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (eg., from Śaivism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (eg., Candragupta) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त) is an example of a Śaivite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (eg., from Śaivism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (eg., Candragupta) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

Source: academia.edu: Who was the Indian King Sandrokottus?

Sandrokottus or Candragupta, the son of Xandremes or Candra.—We know only the name of King Candra (Xandremes) in the Iron Pillar inscription. There is no information about who was his successor. Interestingly, Vaman a’s Kavyalankara-sutravritti (3.2.2) clearly mentions that Candraprakasha was the son of Candragupta and his minister was Vasubandhu (950-870 BCE), the great Buddhist philosopher.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (C) next»] — Candragupta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Candragupta (चन्द्रगुप्त).—m.

(-ptaḥ) 1. The registrar of Yama'S court. 2. Chandragupta a king of Pataliputra.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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