Cakri, Cakrī: 12 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Cakri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chakri.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Cakrī (चक्री) is another name for Cakramarda (Cassia tora “sickle senna”) according to the Bhāvaprakāśa, which is a 16th century medicinal thesaurus authored by Bhāvamiśra. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Cakrī (चक्री).—An Ārṣeya pravara of Angīras.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 196. 23.

1b) A name of Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 13. 85.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Cakrī (चक्री) refers to one of the 53 gods to be worshipped and given pāyasa (rice boiled in milk) according to the Vāstuyāga rite in Śaktism (cf. Śāradātilaka-tantra III-V). The worship of these 53 gods happens after assigning them to one of the 64 compartment while constructing a Balimaṇḍapa. Vāstu is the name of a prodigious demon, who was killed by 53 gods (e.g., Cakrī).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Google Books: Vajrayogini

Cakri (चक्रि) refers to “chaplet” (circular wreath) and represents one of the five mudrās (tantric ornaments) of Vajravārāhī, according to the 12th-century Abhisamayamañjarī. These mudrās are depicted upon Vajravārāhī’s body and are all made of human bone. They are made to represent the five signs of kāpālika observance.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

cakrī (चक्री).—f (cakra S) An entertainment consisting in the reading of the Puran̤ &c. or the singing of odes and light airs, all round the assembly. 2 The ridge or projecting band of a turban. 3 A bandalour. 4 An ornament for the turban consisting of buds circularly disposed, with a central flower or tuft or plucked petals. cakrī uḍaviṇēṃ g. of o. To hoot, scout, flout, ridicule. cakrī karaṇēṃ g. of o. (fig. of first sense.) To pull and haul about of one another tumultuously. cakrī guṅga karaṇēṃ-guṅgaviṇēṃ-utaraṇēṃ-bhulaviṇēṃ g. of o. (Lit. To confound or disconcert the cakrī, the bold prominence, "the pride and bravery," of one's turban.) To repress one's swellings and vauntings; to make to lower one's crest, to take in one's horns &c.; to take the conceit out of. Also cakrī guṅga hōṇēṃ-bhulaṇēṃ- utaraṇēṃ g. of s. To be confounded or abashed; to be posed or non-plussed. cakrī phiraviṇēṃ To bring to the front the back side of the cakrī of the turban, in indication of readiness to fight or quarrel.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

cakrī (चक्री).—f An entertainment consisting in the reading of the Purân, &c. or the singing of the odes and light airs, all round the assembly. cakrī uḍaviṇēṃ To hoot, scout, flout, ridicule. To repress one's swellings and vauntings. cakrīṃ guṅga hōṇēṃ-bhulaṇēṃ-utaraṇēṃ To be confounded or abashed; to be posed or non-plussed.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—m. A doer; L. D. B.

Derivable forms: cakriḥ (चक्रिः).

See also (synonyms): cakru.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—m.

(-kriḥ) An agent, a maker, a doer. E. kṛ to do, ki affix the root reduplicate and the deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—[adjective] making, active.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cakrī (चक्री):—[from cakra] a f. a wheel ([instrumental case] sg. kriyā; [genitive case] [dual number] kryos), [Ṛg-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] ([dual number] kriyau), [Kāṭhaka xxix, 7]

3) [from cakra] 1. cakrī ind. in [compound]

4) [from cakra] 2. cakrī f. of kra q.v.

5) Cakri (चक्रि):—[from cakrāṇa] mfn. ([Pāṇini 3-2, 171], [vArttika] 3) doing, effecting (with [accusative]), active, [Ṛg-veda]

6) [v.s. ...] (or cakrin?) Name of a man, [Pravara texts vii, 9] (cf. uru-cakri.)

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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