Cakri, Cakrī, Cakrin: 31 definitions

Introduction:

Cakri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chakri.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Cakrī (चक्री) is another name for Cakramarda, a medicinal plant identified with Cassia tora Linn., synonym of Senna tora or “sickle senna” from the Fabaceae or “legume” family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.198-200 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Cakrī and Cakramarda, there are a total of nineteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Cakrī (चक्री) is a synonym of Sarpa (“snake”), according to the Amarakośa.—The Sanatkumāra Saṃhitā (III.36cd-37ab) states that snakes are of two kinds, Nāgas and Sarpas. While the former can take any form they desire, the latter are those which glide. The Amarakośa (verses I.10.3-6) gives 33 synonyms for snake [viz. Cakrī]. Snakes are said to reside in Nāgaloka which is located in the endless bowels of the earth with countless palaces, houses and towers, it is also known as pātālaloka.

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Cakrī (चक्री) is another name for Cakramarda (Cassia tora “sickle senna”) according to the Bhāvaprakāśa, which is a 16th century medicinal thesaurus authored by Bhāvamiśra. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Cakrī (चक्री):—[cakrīm] Making levigated material into small disc shaped pellets for preparing ashes.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Cakrin (चक्रिन्) refers to the “one who holds the discus” and is used to describe Viṣṇu, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.15 (“Gaṇeśa’s battle”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “On hearing their words, the furious Rudra became more furious and went there along with his Gaṇas. The entire army of the gods along with the discus-bearing (cakrin) Viṣṇu shouted in jubilation and followed Śiva. In the meantime, bowing to Śiva, the lord of the gods with palms joined in reverence, O Nārada, you spoke as follows—[...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Cakrī (चक्री).—An Ārṣeya pravara of Angīras.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 196. 23.

1b) A name of Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 13. 85.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Cakrī (चक्री) refers to one of the 53 gods to be worshipped and given pāyasa (rice boiled in milk) according to the Vāstuyāga rite in Śaktism (cf. Śāradātilaka-tantra III-V). The worship of these 53 gods happens after assigning them to one of the 64 compartment while constructing a Balimaṇḍapa. Vāstu is the name of a prodigious demon, who was killed by 53 gods (e.g., Cakrī).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Cakrin (चक्रिन्).—A grammarian who has written a small disquisition on the correctness of the form जाग्रहीता (jāgrahītā). See जाग्रहीतेतिवाद (jāgrahītetivāda).

Vyakarana book cover
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Google Books: Vajrayogini

Cakri (चक्रि) refers to “chaplet” (circular wreath) and represents one of the five mudrās (tantric ornaments) of Vajravārāhī, according to the 12th-century Abhisamayamañjarī. These mudrās are depicted upon Vajravārāhī’s body and are all made of human bone. They are made to represent the five signs of kāpālika observance.

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (tantric buddhism)

Cakrī (चक्री) refers to a “crown”, representing one of the “five insignias” (Pañcamudrā) worn by the the initiate who observed the outer form of the Vow of Knowledge, according to the Buddhist Hevajratantra.—Accordingly, “He receives the five symbolic adornments, crown [cakrī], earrings [kuṇḍala], necklace [kaṇṭhī], bracelets [rucaka], and girdle, as signs of his success. These he wears on those set occasions... when perfected Yogins and Yoginīs come together, to consume flesh and wine, to sing and dance, and realised their consummation of bliss. He is free from all conventions and wanders as he pleases, knowing no distinction between friend and foe, clean or unclean, good or evil”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Cakrin (चक्रिन्) refers to a sub-division of the Kulārya class of Āryas (one of the two types of human beings), taking birth in the “middle world” (madhyaloka), according to chapter 2.3 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra: an ancient Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three illustrious persons in Jainism.—(cf. Commentary to Tattvārthādhigamasūtra 3.15)

Accordingly:—“In these 35 zones on this side of Mānuṣottara and in the Antaradvīpas, men arise by birth; [...]. From the division into Āryas and Mlecchas they are two-fold. The Āryas have sub-divisions: kṣetra (country), jāti (caste), kula (family), karma (work), śilpa (craft), and bhāṣā (language). [...] Kulāryas are the Kulakaras, Cakrins, Viṣṇus, and Balas, or those who are born in a pure family from the third, fifth, or seventh generation”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Cakrin.—(EI 9), same as Cakravartin. (EI 4, 19), ‘the ruler of a cakra (circle) or district’; title of a provincial ruler. Note: cakrin is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

cakrī (चक्री).—f (cakra S) An entertainment consisting in the reading of the Puran̤ &c. or the singing of odes and light airs, all round the assembly. 2 The ridge or projecting band of a turban. 3 A bandalour. 4 An ornament for the turban consisting of buds circularly disposed, with a central flower or tuft or plucked petals. cakrī uḍaviṇēṃ g. of o. To hoot, scout, flout, ridicule. cakrī karaṇēṃ g. of o. (fig. of first sense.) To pull and haul about of one another tumultuously. cakrī guṅga karaṇēṃ-guṅgaviṇēṃ-utaraṇēṃ-bhulaviṇēṃ g. of o. (Lit. To confound or disconcert the cakrī, the bold prominence, "the pride and bravery," of one's turban.) To repress one's swellings and vauntings; to make to lower one's crest, to take in one's horns &c.; to take the conceit out of. Also cakrī guṅga hōṇēṃ-bhulaṇēṃ- utaraṇēṃ g. of s. To be confounded or abashed; to be posed or non-plussed. cakrī phiraviṇēṃ To bring to the front the back side of the cakrī of the turban, in indication of readiness to fight or quarrel.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

cakrī (चक्री).—f An entertainment consisting in the reading of the Purân, &c. or the singing of the odes and light airs, all round the assembly. cakrī uḍaviṇēṃ To hoot, scout, flout, ridicule. To repress one's swellings and vauntings. cakrīṃ guṅga hōṇēṃ-bhulaṇēṃ-utaraṇēṃ To be confounded or abashed; to be posed or non-plussed.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—m. A doer; L. D. B.

Derivable forms: cakriḥ (चक्रिः).

See also (synonyms): cakru.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cakrin (चक्रिन्).—a. [cakramastyasya ini]

1) Having a wheel, wheeled.

2) Bearing a discus.

3) Driving in a carriage.

4) circular, round.

5) Indicative (sūcaka). -m.

1) An epithet of Viṣṇu or Kṛṣṇa, Śiśupālavadha 13.22; प्रणेमुः पाण्डवा भीष्मं सानुगाः सह चक्रिणा (praṇemuḥ pāṇḍavā bhīṣmaṃ sānugāḥ saha cakriṇā) Bhāgavata 1.9.4.

2) A potter.

3) An oilman.

4) An emperor, a universal monarch, absolute ruler.

5) The governor of a province.

6) An ass.

7) The ruddy goose.

8) An informer.

9) A snake.

1) A crow.

11) A kind of tumbler or juggler.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—m.

(-kriḥ) An agent, a maker, a doer. E. kṛ to do, ki affix the root reduplicate and the deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrin (चक्रिन्).—mfn. (-krī-kriṇī-kri) 1. Having or holding a discus, &c. 2. Wheeled, having a wheel. 3. Circular. m. (-krī) 1. A name of Vishnu. 2. A potter. 3. The ruddy goose. 4. A snake. 5. An informer. 6. A tumbler, one who exhibits tricks with a discus or a wheel. 7. An oil grinder. 8. An emperor, a Chakravarti: see cakravarttin 9. One who rides in a cariage. 10. A crow. 11. An ass. 12. Cassia, (the tree.) E. cakra a wheel, &c. and ini poss. aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrin (चक्रिन्).—i. e. cakra + in, I. adj. Driving in a carriage, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 138. Ii. m. 1. A name of Viṣṇu, [Bhagavadgītā, (ed. Schlegel.)] 11, 17. 2. A name of Śiva, Mahābhārata 13, 745. 3. An oil-grinder, [Yājñavalkya, (ed. Stenzler.)] 1, 141.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि).—[adjective] making, active.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrin (चक्रिन्).—[adjective] having wheels or a discus, driving in a chariot; [masculine] sovereign, king, serpent, [Epithet] of Viṣṇu or Śiva.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cakrī (चक्री):—[from cakra] a f. a wheel ([instrumental case] sg. kriyā; [genitive case] [dual number] kryos), [Ṛg-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] ([dual number] kriyau), [Kāṭhaka xxix, 7]

3) [from cakra] 1. cakrī ind. in [compound]

4) [from cakra] 2. cakrī f. of kra q.v.

5) Cakri (चक्रि):—[from cakrāṇa] mfn. ([Pāṇini 3-2, 171], [vArttika] 3) doing, effecting (with [accusative]), active, [Ṛg-veda]

6) [v.s. ...] (or cakrin?) Name of a man, [Pravara texts vii, 9] (cf. uru-cakri.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cakrin (चक्रिन्):—[from cakra] mfn. having wheels, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] driving in a carriage, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra; Manu-smṛti ii, 138; Yājñavalkya i, 117]

3) [v.s. ...] bearing a discus, or (m.) ‘discus-bearer’, Kṛṣṇa, [Bhagavad-gītā xi, 17; Bhāgavata-purāṇa i, 9, 4; Rājataraṅgiṇī i, 262]

4) [v.s. ...] m. a potter, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] an oil-grinder, [Yājñavalkya i, 141]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of Śiva, [Mahābhārata xiii, 745]

7) [v.s. ...] a sovereign of the world, king, [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

8) [v.s. ...] the governor of a province (grāma-jālika; grāmayājin, ‘one who offers sacrifices for a whole village’ [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]), [Horace H. Wilson]

9) [v.s. ...] a kind of juggler or tumbler who exhibits tricks with a discus or a wheel (jālika-bhid), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] an informer (sūcaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] a cheat, rogue, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a snake

13) [v.s. ...] the Cakra (-vāka) bird, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] an ass, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] a crow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] = kra-gaja, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] ‘Name of a man’ (?) See cakri

18) [v.s. ...] Dalbergia ujjeinensis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

19) [v.s. ...] = kra-kāraka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

20) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a Vaiṣṇava sect (cf. sa-.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakri (चक्रि):—(kriḥ) 2. m. An agent, a maker.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrin (चक्रिन्):—(krī) 5. m. Vishnu; a potter; ruddy goose; snake; tumbler; oil grinder; emperor; crow; ass. a. Holding a discus.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Cakrin (चक्रिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Cakki, Cakkiya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Cakri in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Cakri (ಚಕ್ರಿ):—

1) [noun] = ಚಕ್ರವರ್ತಿ [cakravarti]3 - 1, 2 & 3.

2) [noun] a wheeled vehicle.

3) [noun] an ass or donkey.

4) [noun] a snake or serpent.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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