Cakramadhya, Cakra-madhya: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Cakramadhya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chakramadhya.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Cakramadhya in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Cakramadhya (चक्रमध्य) refers to “one residing in the middle of the wheel (of energies)”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra.—Accordingly, “(The goddess) is the emanation (sṛṣti) of all the elements (bhūta). She creates the universe. Residing in the middle of the wheel (of energies) [i.e., cakramadhya-sthā] or participating in the (clockwise) rotation of the sun, she bestows worldly enjoyment. Established in the lunar nature, she bestows liberation and is called the New Moon. [...]”

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Cakramadhya in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purana

Cakramadhya (चक्रमध्य) refers to the “middle part of the (potter’s) wheel”, according to the Skandapurāṇa 1.2.38 (“The Position of the Higher World”).—Accordingly, “[...] After reaching the zodiac Karkaṭaka (Cancer) he begins the transit to the South. Just as the external ring of the potter’s wheel whirls quickly, so also in the course of the Southern transit the Sun moves quickly. On account of the excessive velocity, he moves with the support of the path of the wind. Hence, he passes over a great deal of ground in a short period. Just as the middle part of the potter’s wheel [i.e.,  kulāla-cakramadhya-stha] moves slowly so also, during the Northern transit the Sun moves slowly. Hence he covers a smaller ground in the course of a greater period. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Cakramadhya in Shaivism glossary
Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (Shaivism)

Cakramadhya (चक्रमध्य) refers to the “middle of the Śrīcakra”, according to the Kulapradīpa (verse 7.111cd).—Accordingly, “He [who is] in the middle of the Śrīcakra [e.g., cakramadhya], is free of detachment, fear and anger”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of cakramadhya in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

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