Brahmottara, Brahman-uttara: 9 definitions

Introduction

Brahmottara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (B) next»] — Brahmottara in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर).—A kingdom of the East.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 121. 50; Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 123; 47. 49.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर) is the name of a country pertaining to the Oḍramāgadhī local usage (pravṛtti) according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 14. These pravṛttis provide information regarding costumes, languages, and manners in different countries of the world. It is mentioned that this local usage (adopted by these countries) depends on the verbal style (bhāratī) and the graceful style (kaiśikī).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (B) next»] — Brahmottara in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—A region in the part of eastern India, which northern portion of the Brahma country or the upper Burma. It is also noted that the Brahma region included both the upper and lower Burma.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous (B) next»] — Brahmottara in Jainism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर) refers to a heavenly abode (kalpa) inhabited by Kalpopapanna gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in the Digambara tradition only. The Kalpopapannas (‘those born in the heavens’) represent a sub-species of the Vaimānika gods, which in turn represents the fourth main classification of devas (gods). This kalpa is also known as Brahmottarakalpa.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर) refers to one of the sixteen heavens (kalpa) hosting the sixteen classes of empyrean celestial beings (vaimānika), according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.19. The living beings residing in the vimānas are called the empyrean gods (vaimānika) and represents one of the four classes of Devas.

What is the number of layers in Brahma and Brahmottara heaven pairs? There are four layers there. Which thought-colourations are there in Brahma and Brahmottara and Lāntava-Kāpiṣṭha gods? They have pink thought-colouration. What is the maximum lifespan of deities in Brahma and Brahmottara kalpas? It is slightly more than ten ocean-measured-periods (sāgara) for both.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Brahmottara.—(IE 8-5), Bengali; corrupt form of brahmatrā. (IA 15), explained as ‘the sanctuary of a temple’. Note: brahmottara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (B) next»] — Brahmottara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर).—a.

1) treating principally of Brahman.

2) consisting chiefly of Brāhmaṇas.

Brahmottara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms brahman and uttara (उत्तर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर).—(1) n. of a purohita among the gods: LV 44.11; (2) (nt.) n. of a mythical city: Divy 602.4; in Av i.202.2 and 203.2 called a ‘palace’, prāsāda.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Brahmottara (ब्रह्मोत्तर):—[from brahma > brahman] mfn. treating principally of Brahmā or consisting chiefly of Brāhmans

2) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a superhuman being, [Lalita-vistara]

3) [v.s. ...] (with Jainas) of a [particular] Kalpa, [Dharmaśarmābhyudaya]

4) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] n. Name of a town, [Divyāvadāna]

6) [v.s. ...] n. of [chapter] of [Skanda-purāṇa] (also called -khaṇḍa n. or laghu-śiva-purāṇa n.)

7) [v.s. ...] n. (also, [probably]) the sanctuary of a temple, [Inscriptions]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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