Bibhrana, Bibhrāṇa: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Bibhrana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Bibhrāṇa (बिभ्राण) refers to “carrying”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I worship the three-eyed sharp-natured Kṣetreśa. His body is black, he has destroyed his adversaries, he carries (bibhrāṇa) a skull-bowl and a spear, [but] he is compassionate. I resort to Śaṅkhanidhi and Padmanidhi, who who sit upon a conch and lotus [respectively] as their seats. They are patient, bear the gestures of generosity and protection in their hands, and bring about everyone’s dreams. [...]

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Bibhrana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bibhrāṇa (बिभ्राण) refers to “having (splendour)” [?], according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.43 (“Description of Śiva’s wonderful sport”).—Accordingly, after Śiva spoke to Viṣṇu and Brahmā: “[...] By that time Yama passed by with twice the splendour of the previous one. On seeing him delighted Menā exclaimed ‘This is Śiva’. ‘No’ said you. By that time Nirṛti, the lord of Puṇyajanas, passed by having (bibhrāṇa) twice the splendour of Yama. On seeing him the delighted Menā said ‘This is Śiva’. ‘No’ said you to her. By that time Varuṇa passed that way. On seeing his splendour twice that of Nirṛti, she said ‘This is Śiva, the bridegroom of Pārvatī’. But you said ‘No’. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Bibhrāṇa (बिभ्राण) refers to “being held (by the arm)”, according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Held by (bibhrāṇa) the left arm, the pure mind of a lotus, now a banner full of blood, A kālpā after the first, surrounded by a head, a half a head of loose hair”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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