Bhutala, Bhūtala, Bhu-tala: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Bhutala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Bhutal.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Bhūtala (भूतल).—Is Pṛthvī.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 2. 21.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Bhūtala (भूतल) refers to the “netherworld”, according to Sāhib Kaul’s Śārikāstrotra.—Accordingly, “[...] He who remembers your next syllable, which is īśa with abja, vahni, and padma, is remembered by goddesses in heaven, Nāga maidens in the netherworld (bhūtala), and women on earth confused by the arrows of Kāma. One of pure mind who recites with complete devotion the lakṣmī-syllable, which is difficult for bad people to obtain, him the goddess of good fortune will always be eager to see, and although unsteady (by nature) she will remain at his doorstep out of devotion. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (tantric Buddhism)

Bhūtala (भूतल) refers to the “surface of the site”, according to the Bhūśalyasūtrapātananimittavidhi section of Jagaddarpaṇa’s Ācāryakriyāsamuccaya, a text within Tantric Buddhism dealing with construction manual for monasteries etc.—Accordingly, “The excellent master [= officiant] in steady meditation, gazing upon the centre of the tip of his nose, should cast the cord on the surface of the site (bhūtala) which has been levelled following the rules exactly. [The cord,] into which [the five threads of the five colours] are twined, has as its nature the five wisdoms and is purified. [It] does not have a knot, and is placed in the centre [of the site before casting]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Bhūtala (भूतल) refers to the “earth”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “On the earth (bhūtala) even the lord of the snakes with a thousand trembling mouths is not able to describe clearly the entire power of the doctrine. Those who have adopted a heterodox doctrine, lacking in [knowledge of the highest] reality, proclaim various doctrines. They are not aware of the reality of things because they are not competent to examine that [doctrine]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhutāḷā (भुताळा) [or ळ्या, ḷyā].—a (bhūta) That injects bhūta or piśāca.

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bhūtala (भूतल).—n (S) pop. bhūtaḷa n The face of the earth.

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bhūtaḷa (भूतळ).—n See under bhūtala.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhutāḷa (भुताळ).—

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bhutāḷā (भुताळा) [-ḷyā, -ळ्या].—a That injects demons.

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bhūtala (भूतल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—n The face of the earth.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल).—the surface of the earth.

Derivable forms: bhūtalam (भूतलम्).

Bhūtala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bhū and tala (तल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल).—n.

(-laṃ) The earth, the surface of the earth. E. bhū and tal below.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल).—n. the earth, [Pañcatantra] 43, 7.

Bhūtala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bhū and tala (तल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल).—[neuter] the surface of the earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल):—[=bhū-tala] n. the surface of the ground, the earth, [Mahābhārata; Pañcatantra; Raghuvaṃśa; Kathāsaritsāgara]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल):—[bhū-tala] (laṃ) 1. n. Surface of the earth.

[Sanskrit to German]

Bhutala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhutala in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Bhūtala (भूतल) [Also spelled bhutal]:—(nm) the surface of earth; the world.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Bhūtala (ಭೂತಲ):—[noun] = ಭೂತಳ [bhutala].

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Bhūtaḷa (ಭೂತಳ):—

1) [noun] the surface of the earth.

2) [noun] the earth.

3) [noun] collectively, all the people.

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Bhūtāḷa (ಭೂತಾಳ):—[noun] = ಭೂತಾಳೆ [bhutale].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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