Bhusita, Bhūsita, Bhushita: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Bhusita means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Bhushit.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Bhūṣita (भूषित) (Cf. Vibhūṣita) means “decoration” or “adorned with”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] His body is adorned on the left [i.e., vāmāṅga-bhūṣita] (by his consort) and he is adorned with a garland of wild flowers. He wears earrings made of snakes and his sacred thread is Vāsuki. The Lord is adorned with tinkling anklets and sits on a ghost in the lotus posture. He is adorned with the five insignia and a garland of severed heads that hangs from his neck up to his feet. [...]”.

2) Bhūṣita (भूषित) means “adorned”, according to the Kulapañcāśikā, an unpublished text attributed to Matsyendranātha teaching secrecy.—Accordingly, “O goddess, one who has matted hair, (or a) shaved head, is covered in ashes and, adorned with the five insignias [i.e., mudrāpañcaka-bhūṣita], observes (the ascetic’s) vow and conduct, one who practices ritual intercourse and is dedicated to drinking as Kaulas do (vīrapāna) within my body is, O Maheśvarī, one who knows (the teachings of the) Kula and is fit by virtue of each one of these (practices) for union (with the Yoginīs). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “being adorned (decorated) (with decorative items)”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[Visualisation of Parameśvara]:—[...] He is adorned (bhūṣita) with nice anklets, armlets, rings and bracelets, and he shines with small toe rings, Channahīras, etc., and diadems and a crown. His face is gracious, beautiful, his lips are smeared with betel leaves. His mind is filled with the joy of wine, and his body is supreme bliss [itself]. [...]”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “(being) adorned” (with a crown), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 2.17-19]—“The pure-souled Ācārya should draw an eight petaled lotus, in smooth, pure earth [that is] smeared with sandal and aloe wood [and] scented [with] fragrant camphor and strong saffron. After he has drawn [the lotus] with a great undertaking, [the Ācarya,] decorated and adorned (bhūṣita) with a crown, smeared with sandalwood, [writes] the mātṛkā. Having placed oṃ in the middle [on the pericarp of the lotus], he should draw [the phonemes of the mātṛkā on the petals] starting in the East”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “(being) adorned (with ornaments)”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “One desirous of a kingdom, one who has been deprived of it or one conquered by [other] rulers, after having paid respect with large masses of wealth to the supreme Guru, the giver of Sudarśana’s Yantra, considering [him] superior to all, should propitiate God Nārāyaṇa—who has large eyes like lotuses, is [of] dark [complexion], clad in a yellow garment, adorned with all ornaments (sarva-ābharaṇa-bhūṣita) and with four arms—following the rules given by the teacher. [...]”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “being bedecked (in ornaments)” (suitable for a marriage ceremony), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.37 (“The letter of betrothal is dispatched”).—Accordingly, as Himavat prepared the wedding of Menā and Śiva: “[...] Then he began collecting foodstuffs and other requisite articles intended for the performance of the marriage. [...] Auspicious rites were started by the mountain on an auspicious day. The womenfolk of the mountain performed the purificatory ceremony for Pārvatī. Women bedecked (bhūṣita) in ornaments performed auspicious rites. The delighted Brahmin women of the city did everything in accordance with the tradition and custom. Great festivities and holy auspicious rites were performed by the delighted Himavat too. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “being adorned (with various colors)”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Oṃ in the middle of mantra inhabited ground, arisen of the four seeds, yaṃ, etc., a maṇḍala of the great elements, wind, fire, water, and earth, Above that, (arising from) the letter suṃ, is the merumaṇḍala, Above that, on a jeweled lion-throne, lotus, and a lunar-disc, Śrī Vajrasattva, two arms, one face, white color, Holding a vajra (and) vajra-bell, (and) adorned wearing various colors (vicitrābharaṇa-bhūṣita), Bearing a monk’s headdress, (and) a sapphire Akṣobhya adorned crown, Thus imagine the worshipful guru. [...]”.

Source: MDPI Books: The Ocean of Heroes

Bhūṣita (भूषित) refers to “being adorned (with jewelry)”, according to the 10th-century Ḍākārṇava-tantra: one of the last Tibetan Tantric scriptures belonging to the Buddhist Saṃvara tradition consisting of 51 chapters.—Accordingly, “[...] [Vajravārāhī] [has her] body smeared with divine perfumes; is decorated with anklets and armlets; is adorned with a divine garland; is ornamented with the six seals; [has] three eyes; [wears] a garland of hairless heads [as a necklace]; is adorned with jewelry (ratnābharaṇa-bhūṣita); is flaming like the destructive fire [at the end of a kalpa]; and is shining with great fire. [...]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Bhushita in India is the name of a plant defined with Alangium salviifolium in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Karangolum mohillae (Tul.) Kuntze (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Das Pflanzenreich (1910)
· Enumeratio Plantarum Zeylaniae: (1859)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Bhushita, for example side effects, diet and recipes, pregnancy safety, chemical composition, extract dosage, health benefits, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhusita in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bhūsita : (pp. of bhūseti) adorned; decorated; beautified.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bhusita, (pp. of bhusati) barking J. IV, 182 (°sadda, barking, noise). See also bhasita. (Page 507)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhūṣita (भूषित).—p S Adorned, ornamented, decorated, embellished.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhūṣita (भूषित).—p. p. [bhūṣ-kta] Decorated, ornamented; मणिना भूषितः सर्पः किमसौ न भयंकरः (maṇinā bhūṣitaḥ sarpaḥ kimasau na bhayaṃkaraḥ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūṣita (भूषित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Adorned, decorated, dressed. E. bhūṣ to adorn, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūṣita (भूषित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Adorned.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bhūṣita (भूषित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Bhūsia.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhusita in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Bhūṣita (भूषित) [Also spelled bhushit]:—(a) decorated, adorned, embellished.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Bhūṣita (ಭೂಷಿತ):—[adjective] decorated; embellished; adorned.

--- OR ---

Bhūṣita (ಭೂಷಿತ):—[noun] a man who is adorned with.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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