Bhudhara, Bhūdhara, Bhu-dhara: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bhudhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Bhudhar.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Bhūdhara (भूधर) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified under the group named Sāndhāra, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 56. The Sāndhāra group contains twenty-five out of a sixty-four total prāsādas (temples) classified under four groups in this chapter. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Bhūdhara is also listed in the Agnipurāṇa which features a list of 45 temple types. It is listed under the group named Māṇika, featuring oval-shaped temples. This list represents a classification of temples in Nort-India.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Bhūdhara.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘seven’. Note: bhūdhara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhūdhara (भूधर).—m (S Supporter of the earth.) A mountain or hill. 2 A title of the snake which upholds the globe. 3 A king.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhūdhara (भूधर).—m A mountain. A king. A title of the snake which upholds the globe.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhūdhara (भूधर).—a.

1) holding or supporting the earth; व्यादिश्यते भूधरतामवेक्ष्य कृष्णेन देहोद्वहनाय शेषः (vyādiśyate bhūdharatāmavekṣya kṛṣṇena dehodvahanāya śeṣaḥ) Ku.3.13.

2) dwelling on the earth. (-raḥ) 1 a mountain; भवभूतेः संबन्धाद् भूधरभूरेव भारती भाति (bhavabhūteḥ saṃbandhād bhūdharabhūreva bhāratī bhāti) Udb.

2) an epithet of Śiva.

3) of Kṛṣna.

4) the number 'seven'. °ईश्वरः, °राजः (īśvaraḥ, °rājaḥ) an epithet of the mountain Himālaya. °जः (jaḥ) a tree.

5) a king; स त्वं भूधर भूतानाम् (sa tvaṃ bhūdhara bhūtānām) Bhāg.1.37.13.

Bhūdhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bhū and dhara (धर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūdhara (भूधर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. A mountain. 2. A kind of chemical or medicinal apparatus; a sand bath in which a covered crucible is placed, and the fire is lighted above as well as below it. 3. The number “seven.” E. bhū earth, dhṛ to support, aff. ap .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūdhara (भूधर).—[bhū-dhara], m. 1. A mountain, [Pañcatantra] 157, 25. 2. A kind of chemical or medicinal apparatus; a sand-bath in which a covered crucible is placed, and the fire is lighted above as well as below it.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhūdhara (भूधर).—[adjective] bearing or supporting the earth; [masculine] mountain.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Bhūdhara (भूधर) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—a Nāgara Brahman of Rājanagara, father of Kṣemendra (Lipiviveka). Ba. 12.

2) Bhūdhara (भूधर):—father of Prabhākara (Gītarāghava 1617). Bhr. 142.

3) Bhūdhara (भूधर):—son of Devadatta Jyotirvid, grandson of Somaśarman, of Kāmpilya, wrote in 1571: Sūryasiddhāntavivaraṇa. Narapatijacaryāṭīkā Mañjarī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhūdhara (भूधर):—[=bhū-dhara] mfn. ‘e°-bearing’, dwelling in the e°, [Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. ‘earth-supporting’, Name of Kṛṣṇa, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] of Baṭuka-bhairava, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] m. a mountain (ifc. f(ā). ), [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Purāṇa] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] m. ‘mountain’ and ‘king’ [Haravijaya]

6) [v.s. ...] a term for the number seven, [Sūryasiddhānta]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of Śiva or of the serpent-demon Śeṣa, [Mahābhārata]

8) [v.s. ...] a kind of chemical or medical apparatus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of sub voce men, [Catalogue(s)]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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